Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond by Brad Lancaster

Appendix 4 – Resources, expanded

These resources are an additiion to those listed in appendix 4 of Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, 2nd Edition.
See appendix 4 of Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, 2nd Edition for more resources.

You can use the search function (command-F on a Mac) to locate a keyword on this very long page, instead of scrolling all the way down the page in search of your link.

This list begins with general rainwater-harvesting resources. Then sections II through XXV follow the topical order in the preface, introduction, chapters, and epilogue. Sections XXVI through XXIX provide helpful funding, financial incentives, human-powered pumps, and water conservation resources.

Note on website URLs: Almost all URLs listed below (or the organization from which a downloadable document is available) are resources in and of themselves.

 

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I. General Resources for Harvesting Rainwater with Earthworks

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Publications

Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1, 3rd Edition: Guiding Principles to Welcome Rain into Your Life and Landscape, by Brad Lancaster. Rainsource Press, 2019.
www.HarvestingRainwater.com

Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, 2nd Edition: Water-Harvesting Earthworks, by Brad Lancaster. Rainsource Press, 2019.
www.HarvestingRainwater.com

City of Tucson Water Harvesting Guidance Manual, edited by Ann Audrey Phillips. City of Tucson, 2005.
www.tucsonaz.gov/files/transportation/2006WaterHarvesting.pdf

Stormwater as a Resource: How to Harvest and Protect a Dryland Treasure, by David Morgan and Sandy Trevathan. A collaboration between the City of Santa Fe and the College of Santa Fe, 2002.
www.nmenv.state.nm.us/swqb/Storm_Water_as_a_Resource.pdf

Permaculture: A Designers’ Manual, by Bill Mollison. Tagari, 1988. This is an excellent guide to integrated, sustainable design. See Chapters 7 and 9 for water-harvesting earthworks.

Making Water Everybody’s Business: Practice and Policy of Water Harvesting, edited by Anil Agarwal, Sunita Narain, and Indira Khurana. Centre for Science and Environment, 2001.
www.cseindia.org

Dying Wisdom: Rise, Fall, and Potential of India’s Traditional Water Harvesting Systems, edited by Anil Agarwal and Sunita Narain. Centre for Science and Environment, 1997.
www.cseindia.org

A Water Harvesting Manual for Urban Areas: Case Studies from Delhi. Centre for Science and Environment, 2000.
www.cseindia.org

The Negev: The Challenge of a Desert, 2nd ed., by Michael Evenari, Leslie Shanan, and Naphtali Tadmor. Harvard University Press, 1982.

The Collection of Rainfall and Runoff in Rural Areas, by Arnold Pacey and Adrian Cullis. Practical Action Publishing (formerly Intermediate Technology Publications), 1986.
practicalactionpublishing.org

Dry: Life Without Water, by Ehsan Masood and Daniel Schaffer. Harvard University Press, 2006. Proven dryland strategies that sustainably enhance local water supply around the world. Beautiful photos and diverse examples.

Drylands Watershed Restoration: Introductory Workshop Activities, by Ben Haggard. Sol y Sombra Foundation, 1994.

Water for Every Farm: Yeomans Keyline Plan, by Ken B. Yeomans. Keyline Designs, 1993.
www.keyline.com.au

“Dynamic Water Storage,” by Tim Murphy. Permaculture Drylands Journal, #30, Summer 1998, pp. 22-24.

Alternative Irrigation: The Promise of Runoff Agriculture, by Christopher J. Barrow. Earthscan Publications Ltd., 1999.
www.earthscan.co.uk

Stormwater BMP Design Supplement for Cold Climates, by Deb Caraco and Richard Claytor. Center for Watershed Protection.
vermont4evolution.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/ulm-elc_coldclimates.pdf

Design for Water, by Heather Kinkade-Levario. New Society Publishers, 2007.

Harvesting Rainwater for Landscape Use, 2nd ed., by Patricia H. Waterfall and Christina Bickelmann. Pima County Cooperative Extension (Low 4 Program) and Arizona Department of Water Resources (TAMA), revised 2006.
www.azwater.gov/azdwr/StatewidePlanning/Conservation/Residential/documents/Harvesting_Rainwater.pdf

Semiarid Soil and Water Conservation, by H. J. Finkel. CRC Press, 1986.

Policy and Practice in the Management of Tropical Watersheds, by H. C. Pereira. Westview Press, 1989.

Skywater: Rain in Japan and Around the World, People for Rainwater, 2003.
www.skywater.jp/index_e.html

“Slow It, Spread It, Sink It . . . And Think It: The Alchemy of Watershed Restoration,” by Katharine Cook with Brock Dolman. Pacific Horticulture, January/February/March 2006.
seaturtles.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/1141687139_Brocks_Article.pdf

Slow it. Spread it. Sink it!: A Homeowner’s and Landowner’s Guide to Beneficial Stormwater Management, Southern Sonoma County Resource Conservation District and The Resource Conservation District of Santa Cruz County. Sonoma Valley Groundwater Management Program, 2010. This publication comprises chapters on Understanding and Evaluating Stormwater Runoff Around Your Home, Best Management Practices for Stormwater Around the Home, Difficult Sites and Site Constraints, Local Projects, and a Resources Guide. Available online at:
www.sscrcd.org/rainwater.php

CD-ROM

Training Course on Water Harvesting for Improved Agricultural Production, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, 2003.
www.fao.org

Online (in addition to above)

www.RainwaterHarvesting.org
Water-harvesting site of the CSE, one of India’s leading environmental NGOs. Although its primary focus is on India, it offers much information that is pertinent to rainwater harvesting around the globe.

www.harvesth2o.com
A great site chock full of articles, case studies, and resources on rainwater harvesting.

www.RainwaterClub.org
Another great site with projects and resources pertaining to India and beyond.

 

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II (Preface). Mr. Zephaniah Phiri, ZWRP Zvishavane Water Resources Project, Muonde Trust

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Publication

The Water Harvester: Episodes from the Inspired Life of Zephaniah Phiri, by Mary Witoshynsky. Weaver Press, 2000.
Weaver Press
Box A1922
Harare, Zimbabwe

Organization

Zvishavane Water Resources Project
This is the NGO started by Mr. Zephaniah Phiri Maseko.
But it was in transition when I last visited Zimbabwe.
See Muonde Trust below, as they were better supporting Mr. Phiri’s vision and work when I last visited.
P.O. Box 118
Zvishavane, Zimbabwe

Muonde Trust
www.Muonde.org

 

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III (Preface). Santa Cruz River, Southern Arizona

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The Lessening Stream: An Environmental History of the Santa Cruz River, by Michael F. Logan. University of Arizona Press, 2002.

 

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IV (Preface). Water Conservation Strategies for the Industrial and Conventional Agriculture Sectors and Beyond

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When the Rivers Run Dry: Water – The Defining Crisis of the Twenty-First Century, by Fred Pearce. Beacon Press, 2006.

Blue Gold: The Fight to Stop the Corporate Theft of the World’s Water, by Maude Barlow and Tony Clarke. The New Press, 2002.

 

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V (Introduction). Soil and Vegetation – The Foundation of Earthworks’ Living Systems

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Publications

The Soil and Health: A Study of Organic Agriculture, by Sir Albert Howard with a new introduction by Wendell Berry. University Press of Kentucky, 2006.

Gaia’s Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture, by Toby Hemenway. Chelsea Green Publishing Company, 2001.

Food from Dryland Gardens, by David Cleveland and Daniela Soleri. Center for People, Food, and Environment, 1991. CD-ROM, 2002.

A Guide for Desert and Dryland Restoration: New Hope for Arid Lands, by David A. Bainbridge. Island Press, 2007.

Permaculture: A Designer’s Manual, by Bill Mollison. Tagari Publications, 1988.

Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World, by Paul Stamets. Ten Speed Press, 2005.

Online

www.desertrestore.org
David A. Bainbridge’s resource-laden website.

 

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VI (Introduction). Fossil-Fuel-Free Landscaping/Gardening

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www.owendell.com/Articles/sustaingarden.html
“The Sustainable Garden, Part One: A Polemic,” by Owen E. Dell. Pacific Horticulture, Winter 1998.

www.owendell.com/Articles/sustaingarden2.html
“The Sustainable Garden, Part Two: Imagining a Better Garden,” by Owen E. Dell. Pacific Horticulture, Winter 1998.

 

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VII (Introduction). Taking Action to Reduce Global Warming and Our Ecological Footprint

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Publications

The Weather Makers: How Man Is Changing the Climate and What It Means for Life on Earth, by Tim Flannery. Atlantic Monthly Press, 2005.

An Inconvenient Truth: The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What We Can Do About It, by Al Gore. Rodale Press, 2006.

Low Carbon Diet: A 30 Day Program to Lose 5,000 Pounds, by David Gershon. Empowerment Institute, 2006. The website is packed with simple and effective strategies you can put into practice NOW to reduce negative climate change.
www.empowermentinstitute.net

Videos/DVDs

An Inconvenient Truth: A Global Warning, with Al Gore. Paramount Home Video, 2006. A rallying cry to protect the one earth we all share.

Online (in addition to above)

www.footprintnetwork.org
A very informative site allowing you to calculate your own ecological footprint and to track those of various countries and how they are improving or worsening over time.

www.sightline.org/maps/charts/climate-CO2byMode
Great Green Travel Ranking graphs comparing the carbon emissions of various forms of transportation. Provided by the Sightline Institute.

www.energysavingcommunity.co.uk/communityprojectscategory
EnergySavingCommunity is a website that “sets out to demystify the whole topic of energy-saving and to examine all of the ways that a community can make a difference, with a comprehensive range of unique content written by experts giving you the practical information necessary to help you make the right choice.” This particular page is focused on practical actions a community can take.

earthday.net/footprint2/index.html
Earthday footprint quiz. Quickly and easily estimate your ecological footprint with this online calculator. It also includes tips on how to improve your footprint, though it doesn’t take integrated water harvesting into account.

www.fightglobalwarming.com
Information on global warming and how to reduce it.

www.stopglobalwarming.org
More information on global warming and how to reduce it.

www.takepart.com/an-inconvenient-truth
The “Take Action” menu has proactive steps you can take to become carbon neutral.

energy.sourceguides.com/businesses/index.shtml
Provides information on where to find businesses that offer renewable energy solutions such as wind and solar energy.

climatefriendly.com/personal
Information on calculating your carbon footprint, and how to neutralize it.

www.carbonfootprint.com/calculator.aspx
Another resource with information on calculating your carbon footprint, and how to neutralize it.

www.eere.energy.gov/greenpower/buying/buying_power.shtml
U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy website. Provides information on where you can buy green power (greatly reducing carbon emissions of dirtier power production such as burning of coal) in your state.

www.solarenergy.org
Solar Energy International’s website. They provide workshops and information on how to purchase and install your own solar, wind, or micro-hydro system.

www.coolcities.us
This site recognizes cities that are taking steps to reducing global warming, and helps you join and further the efforts.

Effect of Resource Consumption Increasing with Population

“Arithmetic, Population and Energy,” by Dr. Albert Bartlett. The retired Professor of Physics from the University of Colorado in Boulder examines the arithmetic of steady growth, continued over modest periods of time, in a finite environment. These concepts are applied to populations and to fossil fuels such as petroleum and coal. Online video/audio/transcript:
www.globalpublicmedia.com/lectures/461

 

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VIII (Introduction). Water Harvesting in India

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Publications

Ripples of the Society: People’s Movements in Watershed Development in India, by G. Sheena. Gandhi Peace Foundation and Food and Agriculture Organisation of United Nations (FAO/UN), 1998.

Making Water Everybody’s Business: Practice and Policy of Water Harvesting, edited by Anil Agarwal, Sunita Narain, and Indira Khurana. Centre for Science and Environment, 2001.
www.cseindia.org

The Radiant Raindrops of Rajasthan, by Anupam Mishra. Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology, 2001.
www.navdanya.org

Harvesting the Rains in Thar, by Pramod Kulkarni. Gramin Vikas Vigyan Samiti (GRAVIS), 2003.
www.gravis.org.in

Traditional Agricultural and Water Technologies of the Thar, by Bharat Jhunjhunwala. Gramin Vikas Vigyan Samiti (GRAVIS), 2003.
www.gravis.org.in

Dying Wisdom: Rise, Fall, and Potential of India’s Traditional Water Harvesting Systems, edited by Anil Agarwal and Sunita Narain. Centre for Science and Environment, 1997.
www.cseindia.org

Tanks of South India, edited by A Vaidyanathan. Centre for Science and Environment, 2001.
www.cseindia.org

Rain Water Harvesting by Shree Padre. Altermedia, 2003.
www.altermediaindia.com

Videos

Harvest of Rain. Centre for Science and Environment (India). Documents traditional water harvesting in India.
www.RainwaterHarvesting.org

The Rain Catchers. Centre for Science and Environment (India). Examples of urban rainwater harvesting in India.
www.RainwaterHarvesting.org

Online (in addition to above)

www.gvnml.org
The website of Gram Vikas Navyuak Mandal Laporiya (GVNML).

www.RainwaterHarvesting.org
Water-harvesting site of the Centre for Science and Environment (CSE), one of India’s leading environmental NGOs. One of its focuses is on promotion of rainwater harvesting. Although its primary focus is on India, this website offers much information that is pertinent to rainwater harvesting around the globe.

www.RainwaterClub.org
Another great site with projects and resources pertaining to India and beyond.

www.raincentre.org
Akash Ganga Chennai Rain Centre, Chennai, India. This is a successful urban rainwater-harvesting demonstration site.

 

IX (Chapter 1). Assessing Your Site, Choosing Your Earthworks, and Tips on Implementation

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Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1: Guiding Principles to Welcome Rain into Your Life and Landscape, by Brad Lancaster. Rainsource Press, 2006, revised 2008 and 2009.

Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2: Water-Harvesting Earthworks, by Brad Lancaster. Rainsource Press, 2008.

An Introduction to Permaculture, by Bill Mollison. Tagari, 1988.

Permaculture: A Designers’ Manual, by Bill Mollison. Tagari, 1988.

Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability, by David Holmgren. Holmgren Design Services, 2002.
www.holmgren.com.au

Energy Conserving Site Design, edited by E. Gregory McPherson. American Society of Architects, 1984.

Sun, Wind, and Light: Architectural Design Strategies, 2nd ed., by G.Z. Brown and Mark DeKay. William Stout Architectural Books, 2000.

 

X (Chapter 2). Infiltration Basins

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Plant Water Requirements

Water Requirement of Landscape Trees: Final Report, by Jimmy L. Tipton. Phoenix Arizona Department of Water Resources, 1997. See also this book’s appendix 4, Example Plant Lists and Water Requirement Calculations for Tucson, Arizona.
Clay Pot Irrigation

“Buried Clay Pot Irrigation,” by David A. Bainbridge. Agricultural Water Management 48(2):79-88.
www.ecocomposite.org/restoration/claypot.htm

Beyond Drip Irrigation: Hyper-Efficient Irrigation Systems, by D. A. Bainbridge, 2006. From the proceedings of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineering Annual International Meeting, Portland, Oregon, 2006.
ASABE#062073; St Joseph, Michigan.

Clay Pot Irrigation Supplies

Agua de Vida Ollas
Among other activities, this Albuquerque, NM-based organization makes and sells beautiful clay ollas for subsurface irrigation.
www.eastcentralministries.org

For more alternative irrigation strategies see “deep pipe irrigation” in:

Section XII (French Drains)

Section XV (Mulching)

Section XX (Vegetation) – Alternative irrigation strategies

Rain Gardens

Publications

Creating Rain Gardens: Capturing the Rain for Your Own Water-Efficient Garden, by Cleo Woelfle-Erskine and Apryl Uncapher. Timber Press, 2012.

How Does Your Garden Grow? A Reference Guide to Enhancing Your Rain Garden, by Prince George’s County Department of Environmental Resources.
Inglewood Center Three
9400 Peppercorn Place, 6th Floor
Largo, Maryland 20774

Bioretention Manual, by Derek A. Winogradoff. Provides standards for small bioretention systems including rain gardens.
www.princegeorgescountymd.gov/der/esg/bioretention/bioretention.asp

Online (in addition to above)

www.RainGardens.org
Rain Gardens of West Michigan, with many resources for wetter climates.

www.RainGardenNetwork.com
Rain Garden Network. Midwest emphasis.

Basins as Garden Beds

Food from Dryland Gardens, by David Cleveland and Daniela Soleri. Center for People, Food and Environment, 1991. CD-ROM, 2002.

Desert Harvest: A Guide to Vegetable Gardening in Arid Lands, by Jane Nyhuis. Growing Connections, 1982.

Infiltration Basins as Alternatives to Flood-Control Detention & Retention Basins

The Milagro Cohousing Community has integrated water harvesting infiltration basins, food-production, wastewater treated on site and recycled as subsurface irrigation water, and passive solar design into its landscape.
www.milagrocohousing.org

Basins in Community Gardens

“Casting Seed and Deepening Roots: Creating a Community Garden in Tucson,” Permaculture Activist (#42), December 1999 .

 

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XI (Chapter 3). Berms & Basins

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General Resources

Publications

The Negev: The Challenge of a Desert, 2nd ed., by Michael Evenari, Leslie Shanan, and Naphtali Tadmor. Harvard University Press, 1982.

The Collection of Rainfall and Runoff in Rural Areas, by Arnold Pacey and Adrian Cullis. Practical Action Publishing (formerly Intermediate Technology Publications), 1986.
practicalactionpublishing.org

Permaculture: A Designer’s Manual, by Bill Mollison. Tagari, 1988. See Chapters 7 and 9.

CD-ROM

Training Course on Water Harvesting for Improved Agricultural Production, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, 2003.
www.fao.org

Guides to Using Berms as Roads

Green Streets: Innovative Solutions for Stormwater and Stream Crossings. Metro, 2002.

Handbook for Forest and Ranch Roads: A Guide for Planning, Designing, Constructing, Reconstructing, Maintaining, and Closing Wildland Roads, by William Weaver and Danny Hagans. Mendocino County Resource Conservation District, 1994.

Water Harvesting from Low-Standard Rural Roads, by Bill Zeedyk. Quivira Coalition, April 2006.
quiviracoalition.org/images/pdfs/1888-A_Good_Road_Lies_Easy_on_the_Land.pdf

Water for Every Farm: Yeomans’ Keyline Plan by Ken Yeomans and P. A. Yeomans. Keyline Designs, 1993. See more keyline resources under Chapter 9.
www.keyline.com.au

Planting Fire Breaks & Designing for Fire Protection

Publications

Defensible Space Landscaping in the Urban/Wild Interface. University of California Forest Products Laboratory, 1997.

The Flywire House: A Case Study in Design Against Bushfire, by David Holmgren. Nascimanere Pty Ltd, Crystal Waters, 1993.
www.holmgren.com.au

Online

www.firewise.org
The website of Fire Wise.

www.fs.fed.us/database/feis
The website of Fire Effects Information.

Windbreak and Snowbreak Design

Energy Conserving Site Design, by E. Gregory McPherson. American Society of Landscape Architects, 1984, pp. 165-83.

Permaculture: A Designers’ Manual, by Bill Mollison. Tagari Publications, 1988, pp. 386-87.

Contact your local Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) district agent. The NRCS is a program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
www.nrcs.usda.gov

 

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XII (Chapter 4). Terraces

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How To Build Retaining Walls

Publications

The Art and Craft of Stonescaping: Setting and Stacking Stone, by David Reed. Lark Books, 2000.

Earthship III: Evolution Beyond Economics, by Michael E. Reynolds. Solar Survival Press, 1993.
www.earthship.net/Store/index.php?act=viewProd&productId=4

Basic Masonry. Sunset Publishing Corporation, 1995.

Online

www.creativehomeowner.com/index.php?pane=project&projectid=chwlk137
“Projects Online: Building a Dry-Stacked Stone Wall.”

 

Sources of Salvaged Concrete or “Urbanite” for Terrace Retaining Walls

Nearby construction zone (ask first)

Your local landfill (some landfills separate concrete from other wastes, and allow you to take it for free)

Recycler’s World
www.recycle.net

Craig’s List
www.craigslist.org

Freecycle
www.freecycle.org

Terracing as Infrastructure of Traditional Community Water Management

“Trickle-Down Theory, Andean Style: Traditional Irrigation Practices Provide a Lesson in Sharing,” by Paul Trawick. Natural History, October, 2002, pp. 60-65.

The Struggle for Water in Peru: Comedy and Tragedy in the Andean Commons, by Paul B. Trawick. Stanford University Press, 2003.

“Trinchera Tradition in the Sierra Madre” by Barney Burns. Seedhead News, Fall Equinox, 2002. A publication of Native Seeds/SEARCH.
www.nativeseeds.org

 

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XIII (Chapter 5). Infiltration Trenches

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Suppliers of Infiltration Chambers/ Leaching Chambers/ Subsurface Outlet Chambers

Infiltrator Systems, Inc.
Their “Quick4 Standard Chamber” is ideal for French drain, greywater harvesting, and septic leach field applications since its height does not exceed 12 inches (30 cm). Therefore the majority of the water discharged through the chambers infiltrates into the top 2 feet (0.6 m) of soil where roots and soil life can more readily utilize the water.
6 Business Park Road, P.O. Box 768, Old Saybrook, CT 06475
800 221-4436
www.infiltratorsystems.com.

Hancor
Their “Standard EnviroChamber” or “EnviroChamber ProArc Standard Chamber” are their best chambers for water harvesting since their height does not exceed 13 inches (33 cm), so the majority of the water discharged through the chambers infiltrates into the top 2 feet (0.6 m) of soil where roots and soil life can more readily utilize the water. Check out their “EnviroChamber Downspout System Drainage” information for sizing recommendations, while thinking “harvest” rather than “drainage.”
www.hancor.com

Suppliers of Water Drainage Products That Can Be Used as Water Harvest Products

NDS, Inc.
I’ve used their drainpipe grates and pop-up covers with French drain overflow pipes. They also have plastic couplings transitioning from square downspouts to round subsurface pipe.
www.ndspro.com

Deep Pipe Irrigation

“Deep Pipe Irrigation,” by D. A. Bainbridge. The Overstory #175, 2006.
www.agroforestry.net/overstory/index.html
www.ecocomposite.org/restoration/deeppipe.htm

For additional alternative-irrigation-strategy resources see:

Clay Pot Irrigation (in section XIII: Infiltration Basins)

Mulching (section XV)

Alternative Irrigation Strategies (in section XX: Vegetation)

 

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XIV (Chapter 6). Imprinting

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Publication

A Guide for Desert and Dryland Restoration: New Hope for Arid Lands, by David A. Bainbridge. The Science and Practice of Ecological Restoration Series, Island Press, 2007.
www.desertrestore.org

Holistic Management, 3rd Edition: A Commonsense Revolution to Restore Our Environment, by Allan Savory and Jody Butterfield. Island Press, 2016.

Video

“Global Gardener”
Footage of an imprinting project similar to the one in Marana, Arizona. Look for the drylands section of the 4-part video, available from Bullfrog Films.
www.bullfrogfilms.com

Organization

The Imprinting Foundation
Imprinting consultation, specifications on constructing imprinter rollers, and sources of imprinter services.
www.imprinting.org

 

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XV (Chapter 7). Mulching

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Publications

“A Landscaper’s Guide to Mulch,” by the Alameda County Waste Management Authority and the Alameda County Source Reduction and Recycling Board.
www.stopwaste.org

“A Landscaper’s Guide to Grasscycling,” by the Alameda County Waste Management Authority and the Alameda County Source Reduction and Recycling Board.
www.stopwaste.org

Food from Dryland Gardens, by David Cleveland and Daniela Soleri. Center for People, Food and Environment, 1991. CD-ROM, 2002.

“Prehistoric Agave Cultivation in Southern Arizona,” by Suzanne Fish, Paul Fish, Charles Miksicek, and John Madsen. Desert Plants, Volume 7, Number 2, 1985.

“Water Harvesting Traditions in the Desert Southwest,” by Joel Glanzberg. Appendix 2 in Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1, Rainsource Press, 2006.

“Irrigation and Surface Mulch Effects on Transplant Establishment,” by D. A. Bainbridge. Native Plants Journal 2(1):25-29, 2001.

“Vertical Mulch for Soil Improvement,” by D. A. Bainbridge. Restoration and Management Notes 14(1):72, 1996.

Ruth Stout’s No-Work Gardening

Publications

Gardening Without Work: For the Aging, the Busy, and the Indolent, by Ruth Stout. Lyons Press, 1998.

How to Have a Green Thumb without an Aching Back, by Ruth Stout. Cornerstone Library, 1972.

Video

Ruth Stout’s Garden, Arthur Mokin Productions. Inspirational, entertaining.

 

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XVI (Chapter 8). Reducing Hardscape & Car Usage

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Alternatives to Car Ownership & Land Uses Requiring Paving

Publications

Sustainability and Cities: Overcoming Automobile Dependence, by Peter Newman and Jeff Kenworthy. Island Press, 1999.

Sustainable Transport Magazine. Institute for Transportation and Development Policy/ITDP. Their website is a resource in and of itself.
www.itdp.org

CarBusters Magazine
www.carbusters.org

How to Live Well Without Owning a Car, by Chris Balish.
Ten Speed Press, 2006.

Online (in addition to above)

www.carfree.com
Carfree Cities. Great examples and links.

www.zipcar.com
Zipcar car-sharing services. Members pay an hourly or monthly rate to use new vehicles located in reserved parking lots throughout a metropolitan region.

www.carplus.org.uk
Car Plus is a European non-profit helping communities and associations promote car-sharing programs called “car clubs.”

www.LessTraffic.com
This website features low-cost, self-help programs for cities, neighborhoods, schools, and individuals to calm and reduce traffic.

www.walkinginfo.org
Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center. A good site that has a walking checklist for assessing the walkability of your community.

www.walkscore.com
This site rates the walkability of neighborhoods. Use it as an incentive to better the rating of sites everywhere.

www.americawalks.org
Good resource for tools to make your community more walkable.

www.walkable.org
Walkable Communities, Inc., has many publications and resources online.
Integrated Sustainable Stormwater Projects (e.g., Pavement Reduction, Urban Forestry, & Runoff Harvesting for Passive Irrigation)

www.metrocouncil.org/environment/water/bmp/manual.htm
Urban Small Sites Best Management Practice Manual, by Metropolitan Council’s Environmental Services. Includes information on pavement reduction, stormwater management, and more.

www.treepeople.org
Features TreePeople water-harvesting demonstration sites in Los Angeles, California, and the effort to manage the city as a forested watershed.

www.seattle.gov/util/engineering/projects/drainagesystem/greenstormwaterinfrastructure/completedgsiprojects
Features Seattle, Washington’s, Public Utilities SEA Streets Project. The site is full of progressive multi-use water harvesting, beautification, and flood-control strategies in the public rights-of-way.

www.seattle.gov/util/EnvironmentConservation/Projects/GreenStormwaterInfrastructure/CompletedGSIProjects/BroadviewGreenGrid/index.htm
Overview of the Broadview Green Grid Natural Drainage Project, Seattle, Washington. Features the multiple integrated benefits of this Natural Drainage Systems (NDS) project spanning 15 blocks of a residential neighborhood.

www.growingvinestreet.org
Growing Vine Street Project, Seattle, Washington. This project is a laboratory for green solutions within an urban design context. The goals are three-fold: to treat roof runoff through biofiltration, to create a refreshing green space for the community, and to reintroduce the natural hydrologic cycle into our urban lives. Includes water-harvesting public art/cisterns, community gardens, urban tree planting, cistern steps, and more.

www.portlandonline.com/bes
Search “sustainable stormwater” on this site to find information about Portland, Oregon’s, Sustainable Stormwater Program. Features Natural Drainage Systems that are progressive multi-use water harvesting, beautification, and flood control strategies in the public rights-of-way and beyond. Includes permeable paving, water-harvesting curb cuts, bioremediation of toxins, urban forestry, and more.

www.portlandonline.com/bes
Search “natural drainage tour,” “water harvesting,” et cetera, to find information about self-guided walking, bicycling, and driving tours of Natural Drainage Systems, water-harvesting, eco-roofs, and more, in Portland, Oregon. Look to these downloadable self-guided tours as models that can be replicated in your community.

www.portlandonline.com/bes
Search “stewardship,” “urban forestry,” et cetera, to locate information on Portland, Oregon’s, Community Watershed Stewardship Program. Features eco-roofs, water-harvesting swales, restoration projects, urban forestry, and more.

www.wsud.org
Water Sensitive Urban Design (WUSD) in Australia. Features progressive multi-use water-harvesting, beautification, and flood control strategies in the public rights-of-way and beyond.

www.drachmaninstitute.org
The Keeling Neighborhood Greenway, Tucson, Arizona. The plan can be found at the listed website under the “portfolio” section, and includes a lot of passive water harvesting off streets and sidewalks to irrigate native shade trees.

www.lid-stormwater.net/biotrans_home.htm
Transportation Bioretention in Maryland and Minnesota.

www.lowimpactdevelopment.org
The Low Impact Development Center.

www.estuarypartnership.org/sites/default/files/fieldguide/techniques.htm
Lower Columbia River Field Guide to Water-Quality-Friendly Development, Strategies and Techniques. Portland, Oregon.

www.estuarypartnership.org/sites/default/files/fieldguide/examples.htm
Lower Columbia River Field Guide to Water-Quality-Friendly Development, Integrated Site Examples. Portland, Oregon.

www.DesertHarvesters.org
A grassroots effort promoting, celebrating, and enhancing local food security and production by encouraging the planting of indigenous, food-bearing shade trees (such as the velvet mesquite) in water-harvesting earthworks, and then educating the public on ways to harvest, process, and enjoy the bounty.

Traffic Calming (in addition to “Alternatives to Car Ownership” above)

www.trafficcalming.org
Great examples of traffic calming strategies and info on their effectiveness. Tweak these designs so they also reduce hardscape and harvest stormwater by depressing planting areas to hold rainfall or by directing runoff from adjoining pavement to planting areas with curb cuts. Plant the vegetated areas with shade trees to reduce the heat-island effect while improving comfort for all.

www.HarvestingRainwater.com/image-gallery/water-harvesting-traffic-calming
Examples of water-harvesting traffic calming.

Green Streets & Roadways

Green Streets: Innovative Solutions for Stormwater and Stream Crossings, by Metro, 2002.

Handbook for Forest and Ranch Roads: A Guide for Planning, Designing, Constructing, Reconstructing, Maintaining, and Closing Wildland Roads, by William Weaver and Danny Hagans. Mendocino County Resource Conservation District. June, 1994.

Water Harvesting from Low-Standard Rural Roads, by Bill Zeedyk. Quivira Coalition, 2006.
quiviracoalition.org/images/pdfs/1888-A_Good_Road_Lies_Easy_on_the_Land.pdf

Managing Roads for Wet Meadow Ecosystem Recovery, by William D. Zeedyk, United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southwestern Region, FHWA-FLP-96-016, 1996.

Skinny Streets and Green Neighborhoods: Design for Environment and Community, by Cynthia Girling and Ronald Kellett. Island Press, 2005.

Cohousing, Garden Cities, Sustainable Neighborhoods & Reducing Building Footprints

Publications

Little House on a Small Planet, by Shay Salomon. Lyons Press, 2006.

The Small House Book, by Jay Shafer. Tumbleweed Tiny House Company, 3-volume set.

Cohousing: A Contemporary Approach to Housing Ourselves, by Kathryn McCamant and Charles Durett. Ten Speed Press, 1994.

Designing Sustainable Communities: Learning from Village Homes, by Judy Corbett and Michael Corbett. Island Press, 1999.

Superbia! 31 Ways To Create Sustainable Neighborhoods, by Dan Chiras and Dave Wann. New Society Publishers, 2003.

The Great Neighborhood Book: A Do-it-Yourself Guide to Placemaking, by Jay Walliasper. New Society Publishers, 2007. A wonderful manual for building vibrant community one practical step at a time.

Online

www.resourcesforlife.com/small-house-society
The Small House Society

www.tumbleweedhouses.com
Tumbleweed Tiny House Company. Site features many efficient tiny house designs and features Jay Shafer’s excellent book, The Small House Book.

www.TinyTexasHouses.com
Perform a websearch using the keywords “Katrina Cottages” to find designs of many efficient, quick-to-build, small homes.

www.NaturalBuildingNetwork.org
Great resources on more environmentally sound natural building practices.

Where to Recycle Asphalt & Concrete

Asphalt Recycling and Reclaiming Association
www.arra.org

City and State Transportation Departments
The staff of these departments can often link you to concrete recycling services. Better yet, try to reuse that heavy, non-toxic concrete beneficially on-site as a material for pavers, check dams, or retaining walls.

Recycler’s World
www.recycle.net

 

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XVII (Chapter 8). Reducing Hardscape, Harvesting Its Runoff, and Creating Permeable Paving

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Publications

Porous Pavements, by Bruce K. Ferguson. CRC Press, 2005.

Stormwater. This journal is published seven times a year for surface water quality professionals. Case studies on porous pavement installation and use are often presented.
www.stormh2o.com/sw.html

The Art and Craft of Stonescaping: Setting and Stacking Stone, by David Reed. Sterling, 1999.

Suppliers of Plastic Geocells

Invisible Structures, Inc.
Makers of Gravelpave2 and Grasspave2
www.invisiblestructures.com

Presto Products
Manufacturers of Geoblock
www.reynoldspkg.com/alcoa-geo/en/home.asp

Funke North America, Ltd.
Manufacturers of Golpla
www.funkenorthamericaltd.com

Suppliers of Open-Jointed, Interlocking Concrete Pavers

SF Concrete Technology, Inc.
SF-RIMA permeable pavements
www.sfconcrete.com

UNI-Group U.S.A.
Uni Eco-Stone permeable pavers
www.uni-groupusa.org

Pavestone
InfiltraStone permeable pavers
www.pavestone.com

Porous Concrete

Porous concrete, “pour water through concrete” resources.
www.perviouspavement.org

Sources of Salvaged Concrete and Brick Paving Material

Nearby construction zone (ask first).

The landfill (some landfills separate concrete and brick from other wastes, and allow you to take it for free).

Recycler’s World
www.recycle.net

Craig’s List
www.craigslist.org

Freecycle
www.freecycle.org

 

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XVIII (Chapter 9). Diversion Swales

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Interceptor Drains

Integrated whole-farm, whole-landscape planning.
www.solutions-site.org/node/46

Keylines & Breaklines

Water for Every Farm: Yeomans Keyline Plan, by Ken Yeomans and P.A. Yeomans. Keyline Designs, 1993.
www.keyline.com.au

The Challenge of Landscape: The Development and Practice of Keyline, by P.A. Yeomans. Keyline Publishing, 1958.
www.soilandhealth.org/01aglibrary/010126yeomansII/010126toc.html

The City Forest: The Keyline Plan for the Human Environment Revolution, by P.A. Yeomans. Keyline Publishing, 1971.
www.soilandhealth.org/01aglibrary/010127yeomansIII/010127toc.html

The Keyline Plan, by P.A. Yeomans, 1954.
www.soilandhealth.org/01aglibrary/010125yeomans/010125toc.html

“The Geographical and Topographical Basis of Keyline,” by J. MacDonald-Holmes.
practicalpermaculture.com/handouts/OwensBroadAcrePermaculture/KeylineDesign/thegeographicalbasisofkeyline.pdf

“Water: You Can’t Live Without It,” by Tobias Policha. This article originally appeared in the October 2001 issue of Oregon Tilth.
bugs.scribble.com/newfiles/water.html

“Yeomans’ Keyline Design for Sustainable Soil, Water, Agroecosystem and Biodiversity Conservation: A Personal Social Ecology Analysis,” by Stuart B. Hill.
For an abstract of this article, which has become difficult to find online, scroll down to the bottom of this page:
lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture/2007-March/026713.html

Ponds & Pond Construction (in addition to Keyline Resources above)

Permaculture: A Designers’ Manual, by Bill Mollison. Chapter 13. Tagari Publications, 1988.

Ponds: Planning, Design, Construction. U.S. Department of Agriculture Handbook Number 590.

Water Storage: Tanks, Cisterns, Aquifers and Ponds for Domestic Supply, Fire and Emergency Use, Plus How to Make Ferrocement Water Tanks, by Art Ludwig. Oasis Design, 2005.

Earth Road Construction

Handbook for Forest and Ranch Roads: A Guide for Planning, Designing, Constructing, Reconstructing, Maintaining, and Closing Wildland Roads, by William Weaver and Danny K. Hagans. Mendocino County Resource Conservation District, 1994.

Earth Roads: Their Construction and Maintenance, by Jack Hindson. Practical Action Publishing (formerly Intermediate Technology Publications), 1983.

A Good Road Lies Easy on the Land: Water Harvesting from Low-Standard Rural Roads, by Bill Zeedyk. Quivira Coalition, 2006.
quiviracoalition.org/images/pdfs/1888-A_Good_Road_Lies_Easy_on_the_Land.pdf

Daylighting Once-Culverted or -Buried Waterways

Daylighting: New Life for Buried Streams, by Richard Pinkham. Rocky Mountain Institute, 2000.
www.rmi.org/rmi/Library/W00-32_DaylightingNewLifeBuriedStreams

Restoring Streams in Cities: A Guide for Planners, Policymakers, and Citizens, by Ann L. Riley. Island Press, 1998.
Village Homes & Its Use of Diversion Swales for Irrigating Landscapes & Controlling Stormwater

Designing Sustainable Communities: Learning from Village Homes, by Judy Corbett and Michael Corbett. Island Press, 2000.

 

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XIX (Chapter 10). In-Channel Strategies

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Sources of salvaged chunks of concrete sidewalk or “urbanite” for check dams

Nearby construction zone (ask first)

Landfills (some landfills separate concrete and brick from other wastes, and allow you to take it for free)

Recycler’s World
www.recycle.net

Craig’s List
www.craigslist.org

Freecycle
www.freecycle.org

Suppliers of pre-manufactured gabion baskets

Maccaferri Gabions
www.maccaferri-northamerica.com

Induced meandering

An Introduction to Induced Meandering: A Method for Restoring Stability to Incised Stream Channels, by Bill Zeedyk. Earth Works Institute and the New Mexico Environment Department, June 2003.
quiviracoalition.org/images/pdfs/1905-Induced_Meandering_Field_Guide.pdf

Let the Water Do the Work: Induced Meandering: An Evolving Method for Restoring Incised Channels, by Bill Zeedyk and Van Clothier. Quivira Coalition, 2008.
http://quiviracoalition.org/Detailed/1113.html

Observing and understanding water flow

Applied River Morphology, by D.L. Rosgen. Wildland Hydrology, 1996.

Fluvial Processes in Dryland Rivers, by William L. Graf. Blackburn Press, 1998.

A View of the River, by Luna B. Leopold. Harvard University Press, 2006.

An Introduction to Erosion Control, 2nd ed., by Bill Zeedyk and Jan-Willem Jansens. Earth Works Institute and Quivira Coalition, 2006.
quiviracoalition.org/images/pdfs/1902-Erosion_Control_Field_Guide.pdf

One-rock check dams

An Introduction to Erosion Control, 2nd ed., by Bill Zeedyk and Jan-Willem Jansens. Earth Works Institute and Quivira Coalition, 2006.
quiviracoalition.org/images/pdfs/1902-Erosion_Control_Field_Guide.pdf

An Introduction to Induced Meandering: A Method for Restoring Stability to Incised Stream Channels, by Bill Zeedyk. Earth Works Institute and the New Mexico Environment Department, June 2003.
quiviracoalition.org/images/pdfs/1905-Induced_Meandering_Field_Guide.pdf

Brush check dams

“Recommendations for the Control and Reclamation of Gullies,” by Quincy C. Ayres. Bulletin 121, Iowa Engineering Experiment Station, Iowa State College, March 13, 1935. Photocopies can be ordered from the Special Collections Department of the Park Library at Iowa State University. Use Library of Congress call number TA1 Io8B.
(515) 294-6672

“Native American Methods for Conservation and Restoration of Semiarid Ephemeral Streams,” by J.B. Norton, F. Bowannie, P. Peynetsa, W. Quandelacy, and S.F. Siebert. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 57.5, Sept-Oct 2002: p. 250 (9).

Jay B. Norton, University of Wyoming. For links to this and additional articles on Zuni brush dams, runoff farming, and traditional agriculture, visit:
www.uwyo.edu/esm/faculty-and-staff/norton

An Introduction to Erosion Control, 2nd ed., by Bill Zeedyk and Jan-Willem Jansens. Earth Works Institute and Quivira Coalition, 2006.
quiviracoalition.org/images/pdfs/1902-Erosion_Control_Field_Guide.pdf

Restoring Streams in Cities: A Guide for Planners, Policymakers, and Citizens, by Ann L. Riley. Island Press, 1998.

“Living Fencerows of the Rio San Miguel, Sonora, Mexico: Traditional Technology for Floodplain Management,” by Gary Paul Nabhan and Edward Sheridan. Human Ecology, Volume 5, Number 2, June 1977, pp. 97-111.
Gabion variations, including single or double fence gabions

“Gully Development and Control: The Status of Our Knowledge,” by Burchard H. Heede. USDA Forest Service, Research Paper RM-169, May 1976. Write to:
Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station
Forest Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Fort Collins CO 80521

Teran Watershed, Cascabel, AZ: Check dams building community

Video and online

“Teran Project: Easing the Effects of Erosion,” a video. Redington Natural Resource Conservation District.
redingtonnrcd.org

The Teran Watershed Project and Rock Wedge Workshop
www.saguaro-juniper.com/i_and_i/rockwedges/wedge_seminar/wedge_seminar.html

El Coronado Ranch

Publication

Agroecological Restoration in Southwestern Woodlands: A Comparative Analysis of Water Harvesting and Erosion Control Methods, by Craig Sponholtz. July 2005. Write to:
Craig Sponholtz
607 Salazar St
Santa Fe NM 87505

DVD

“Harvest Rain,” a DVD showcasing the El Coronado Ranch transformation. Available from:
www.elcoronadoranch.com

Other check-dam case studies

“Improving Southwestern Riparian Areas Through Watershed Management,” by Leonard F. DeBano and Larry J. Schmidt. General Technical Report RM-182.
United States Department of Agriculture
Forest Service
Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station
Fort Collins CO 80526

Making Water Everybody’s Business: Practice and Policy of Water Harvesting, edited by Anil Agarwal, Sunita Narain, and Indira Khurana. Centre for Science and Environment, 2001. In particular, see “Dramatic Turnaround” in chapter 3 for a multi-village effort that revived five rivers.
www.cseindia.org

 

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XX (Chapter 11). Vegetation

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Microclimate & site assessment, firebreaks, windbreaks

Western Fruit Berries and Nuts: How to Select, Grow, and Enjoy, by Robert L. Stebbins and Lance Walheim. H.P. Books, 1981.

An Introduction to Permaculture, by Bill Mollison. Tagari, 1988.

Permaculture: A Designers’ Manual, by Bill Mollison. Tagari, 1988.

Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability, by David Holmgren. Holmgren Design Services, 2002.
www.holmgren.com.au

Energy Conserving Site Design, edited by E. Gregory McPherson. American Society of Architects, 1984.

Sun, Wind, and Light: Architectural Design Strategies, 2nd ed., by G.Z. Brown and Mark DeKay. William Stout Architectural Books, 2000.

Designing and Maintaining Your Edible Landscape Naturally, by Robert Kourik. Metamorphic Press, 1986. A comprehensive and integrated guide on growing vegetables, fruits, flowers, and herbs for ornamental and culinary purposes. The emphasis is on California climates, but the concepts are broadly applicable.

Native plant identification

Shrubs and Trees of the Southwest Deserts, by Janice Emily Bowers. Southwest Parks and Monuments Association, 1993.

Shrubs and Trees of the Southwest Uplands, by Francis H. Elmore. Southwest Parks and Monuments Association, 1976.

Botany in a Day: Herbal Guide to Plant Families, 4th ed., by Thomas Elpel. HOPS Press, 2000.

Native Plants for Southwestern Landscapes, by Judy Mielke. University of Texas Press, 1993.

Native plant uses including cooking, eating, medicinal use, and more

Food Plants of the Sonoran Desert, by Wendy Hodgson. University of Arizona Press, 2001.

Medicinal Plants of the Desert and Canyon West, by Michael Moore. Museum of New Mexico Press, 1989.

American Indian Cooking: Recipes From the Southwest, by Carolyn J. Niethammer. University of Nebraska Press, 1999.

The Tumbleweed Gourmet: Cooking with Wild Southwestern Plants, by Carolyn J. Niethammer. University of Arizona Press, 1987.

Handbook of Indian Foods and Fibers of Arid America, by Walter Ebeling. University of California Press, 1986.

Wild Plants and Native Peoples of the Four Corners, by William Dunmire and Gail Tierney. Museum of New Mexico Press, 1997.

Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants, by Christopher Nyerges. Chicago Review Press, 1999.

The Prickly Pear Cookbook, by Carolyn Niethammer. Rio Nuevo Publishers, 2004.

Primitive Technology: A Book of Earthskills, edited by David Wescott. Gibbs Smith, 1999.
Uses of native & exotic plants with culinary emphasis

Cornucopia II: A Source Book of Edible Plants, by Stephen Facciola. Kampong Publications, 1998.

You Can Have Your Permaculture and Eat It Too, by Robin Clayfield. Earthcare Education, 1996.

The Forager’s Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants, by Samuel Thayer. Forager’s Harvest Press, 2006.

The Neighborhood Forager: A Guide for the Wild Food Gourmet, by Robert Henderson. Chelsea Green Publishing, 2000.

The Permaculture Book of Ferment and Human Nuturition, by Bill Mollison. Tagari Publications, 1993.

Fruits of the Desert, by Sandal English. The Arizona Daily Star, 1981.

Fruit-tree grafting

The Grafter’s Handbook, by R.J. Garner. Cassell Publishers Limited, 1999.

Designing and Maintaining Your Edible Landscape Naturally, by Robert Kourik. Metamorphic Press, 1986.

Food from Dryland Gardens, by David Cleveland and Daniela Soleri. Center for People, Food, and Environment, 1991. CD-ROM, 2002.

Multiuse climate-appropriate perennial and annual fruits, nuts, and other plants

Lists & Suppliers

Western Fruit Berries and Nuts: How to Select, Grow, and Enjoy, by Robert L. Stebbins and Lance Walheim. H.P. Books, 1981.

Citrus: Complete Guide to Selecting and Growing More than 100 Varieties for California, Arizona, Texas, the Gulf Coast, Florida, by Lance Walheim. Ironwood Press, 1996.

Cornucopia II: A Source Book of Edible Plants, by Stephen Facciola. Kampong Publications, 1998.

Fruit, Berry and Nut Inventory: An Inventory of Nursery Catalogs Listing All Fruit, Berry and Nut Varieties Available by Mail Order in the United States, by Kent Whealy and Joanne Thuente. Seed Savers Exchange, 2001.

Garden Seed Inventory: Inventory of Seed Catalogs Listing All Non-Hybrid Vegetable Seeds, Available in the United States and Canada, by Kent Whealy. Seed Savers Exchange, 2005.

Organizations

Southwest Regis-Tree
A program documenting and promoting use of traditional fruit- and nut-tree cultivars. Scroll down on this page for a description:
swc.arizona.edu/node/563

Online Resources

Plants For A Future
An online resource center for rare and unusual plants, particularly those which have edible, medicinal or other uses. According to their website, they practice vegan-organic permaculture with emphasis on creating an ecologically sustainable environment based largely on perennial plants. Their database includes over 7,000 plants.
www.pfaf.org

Rare Fruit Tree Growers

Search online for an affiliate in your state/area. They promote the growing and use of rare cultivars to enhance diversity.

Nurseries, trees

Edible Landscaping (Afton VA)
www.ediblelandscaping.com

Santa Cruz Olive Tree Nursery (Santa Cruz CA)
www.santacruzolive.com

Greenfield Citrus Nursery (Mesa AZ)
www.greenfieldcitrus.com

Seed catalogs

Native Seeds/SEARCH (Tucson AZ)
Specializing in traditional Native American crops of the southwest region of North America.
www.nativeseeds.org

Seeds of Change
Organically grown seed.
www.seedsofchange.com

Seed Savers Exchange (Decorah IA)
This non-profit, member-supported organization saves and shares the heirloom seeds of our garden heritage, forming a living legacy that can be passed down through generations. Their members have distributed an estimated 1 million samples of rare garden seeds since the organization’s founding.
www.seedsavers.org

Territorial Seed Company (Cottage Grove OR)
Vegetable and flower seeds, live plants, and supplies. Many heirloom varieties.
www.territorialseed.com

Southwestern U.S. native grasses, annuals, and seed suppliers

Plants of the Southwest (New Mexico)
www.plantsofthesouthwest.com

Wildlands Restoration (Tucson, Arizona)
(520) 882-0969

For seed sources in your area, check with your regional or state native plant society for reputable distributors. You can also inquire with the Plant Material Centers of the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), United States Department of Agriculture, which maintain lists of seed sources.

Arizona plant lists with water-need listings

Arizona Department of Water Resources’ Low Water Use/Drought Tolerant Plant Lists for various regions of the state.
www.azwater.gov/azdwr/WaterManagement/AMAs/LowWaterUsePlantList.htm

Plant guilds

Gaia’s Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture, by Toby Hemenway. Chelsea Green Publishing, 2001.

Permaculture: A Designers’ Manual, by Bill Mollison. Tagari, 1988.

Edible Forest Gardens, by Dave Jacke and Eric Toensmeier. Chelsea Green, 2005.

“Hackberry/Walnut Guilds,” by Tim Murphy. Permaculture Activist, Volume V, No. 2, May 1989.

“Pinyon-Juniper Guild Associations,” by Ben Haggard. Permaculture Drylands Journal, Number 23, August 1995.

Planting guidelines: container trees and shrubs

For a guide (though not using water-harvesting basins) from the Arizona Cooperative Extension see:
ag.arizona.edu/pubs/garden/az1022.pdf

Alternative irrigation strategies

Beyond Drip Irrigation: Hyper Efficient Irrigation Systems, by D. A. Bainbridge, 2006. Proceedings American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineering Annual International Meeting, Portland, Oregon, 2006. ASABE#062073; St. Joseph, Michigan.

“Alternative Irrigation Systems for Arid Land Restoration,” by D.A. Bainbridge. Ecological Restoration 20(1):23-30, 2002.

“Rainfall Catchments Improve Survival of Container Transplants at Mojave Desert site,” by F. Edwards, D. A. Bainbridge, T. A. Zink, and M. F. Allen. Restoration Ecology 18(2):100-103, 2000.

“Techniques for Plant Establishment in Arid Ecosystems,” by D. A. Bainbridge, M. Fidelibus, and R. F. MacAller. Restoration and Management Notes 13(2):198-202, 1995.

“Surface Shaping to Improve Grass Establishment,” by D. A. Bainbridge. Grasslands 10(3):1, 6-8, 2000.

“Pitcher Irrigation for Small Family Farmers,” by D. A. Bainbridge. International Development Digest 2(4):4, 1989.

Self-reliant Agriculture for Dry Lands, by D. A. Bainbridge. Sierra Nature Prints, Twain Hart, CA, 1988, 48 p.

For additional alternative irrigation strategy information in this resources appendix, see:

“Deep pipe irrigation” under Section XII (French drains)

“Clay pot irrigation” under Section XIII (Infiltration Basins)

Section XV (Mulching)

Virtues of certain weeds

Weeds: Guardians of the Soil, by Joseph A. Cocannouer. Devin-Adair, 1950.
journeytoforever.org/farm_library/weeds/WeedsToC.html

Gardening/farming organically/naturally

Publications

Food from Dryland Gardens, by David Cleveland and Daniela Soleri. Center for People, Food and Environment, 1991. CD-ROM, 2002.

Desert Harvest: A Guide to Vegetable Gardening in Arid Lands, by Jane Nyhuis. Growing Connections, 1982.

Growing Food in the Southwest Mountains, 3rd ed., by Lisa Rayner. Flagstaff Tea Party, 2002.

Designing and Maintaining Your Edible Landscape Naturally, by Robert Kourik. Metamorphic Press, 1986.

Seed to Seed: Seed Saving Techniques for the Vegetable Gardener, by Suzanne Ashworth and Kent Whealy. Seed Saver Publications, 2002.

Perennial Vegetables: From Artichokes to Zuiki Taro, A Gardener’s Guide to Over 100 Delicious and Easy to Grow Edibles, by Eric Toensmeier. Chelsea Green, 2007.

Farming with the Wild: Enhancing Biodiversity on Farms and Ranches, by Daniel Imhoff. Sierra Club Books, 2003.

Four Season Harvest, by Elliot Coleman., Chelsea Green, 1999.

Growing Vegetables West of the Cascades: The Complete Guide to Natural Gardening, by Steve Soloman. Sasquatch Books, 2002.

Videos

Ruth Stout’s Garden. Ruth Stout’s Garden,” Arthur Mokin Productions. An inspirational and entertaining 23-minute video on the life of more than 100-year-old, mulch-loving gardener Ruth Stout.

Online

www.cityfarmer.org
Urban Agriculture Notes by City Farmer – Canada’s Office of Urban Agriculture.

Eating locally and organically

Publications

Coming Home To Eat: The Pleasures and Politics of Local Foods, by Gary Paul Nabhan, W.W Norton & Co., 2002.

Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals, by Michael Pollan. Penguin Press, 2006.

The Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved: Inside America’s Underground Food Movements, by Sandor Ellix Katz. Chelsea Green, 2006.

Organization

Organic Consumers Association
This non-profit deals with crucial issues of food safety, industrial agriculture, genetic engineering, children’s health, corporate accountability, Fair Trade, environmental sustainability and other key topics.
www.organicconsumers.org

Street tree orchards and milling mesquite pods into edible flour

Desert Harvesters
A grassroots effort based in Tucson promoting the planting of indigenous, food-bearing shade trees (such as the velvet mesquite) in water-harvesting earthworks, and then educating the public on how to harvest and process the bounty. Great photos and recipes.
www.DesertHarvesters.org

Community tree planting

The Simple Act of Planting a Tree: Healing Your Neighborhood, Your City, and Your World, by TreePeople with Andy and Katie Lipkis, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc., 1990.
www.treepeople.org/simple-act-planting-tree

XXI. Green burials

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Don’t pollute soils and water with your dead, formaldehyde-injected body encased within a metal and hardwood-laden casket. Instead, consider a green burial that won’t pollute soils and water, nor bury precious resources. With green burials you save money and resources as your dead body generates life rather than more death by adding fertility not toxins to the soil.

Publications

Grave Matters: A Journey Through the Modern Funeral Industry to a Natural Way of Burial, by Mark Harris. Scribner, 2007.

Caring For the Dead: A Complete Guide for Those Making Funeral Arrangements with or without a Funeral Director, by Lisa Carlson. Upper Access Books, 1998.

“The Impact of Cemetaries on the Environment and Public Health – An Introductory Briefing,” WHO Regional Office of Europe, 1998. EUR/HFA target 23

Online

www.greenburialcouncil.org
They set standards for and certify providers of green burials in which no water- and soil-contaminating chemical toxins are used. The planting of trees is encouraged as a living monument.

www.honeycreekwoodlands.com
I found this to be an exemplary green/conservation burial ground located close to Atlanta, Georgia.

 

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XXII (Chapter 12). Harvesting Greywater and Other On-Site “Wastes” Turned Resources

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General Greywater Resources

Publications

The New Create an Oasis with Greywater: Your Complete Guide to Choosing, Building and Using Greywater Systems: Includes Branched Drains, by Art Ludwig. Oasis Design, 2006.
oasisdesign.net/greywater/createanoasis/index.htm

Oasis Builder’s Greywater Guide: Installation of Greywater Systems in New Construction and Remodeling, by Art Ludwig. Oasis Design, 2006.
oasisdesign.net/greywater/buildersguide/index.htm

Water from the Sky, by Michael Reynolds. Solar Survival Press, 2005.
www.earthship.net/Store/index.php?act=viewProd&productId=7

Composting Toilet Book: A Practical Guide to Choosing, Planning and Maintaining Composting Toilet Systems: An Alternative to Sewer and Septic Systems, by David Del Porto and Carol Steinfeld. Center for Ecological Pollution Prevention, 2000.

Small Flows Magazine, a bi-annual publication of National Environmental Services Center.
www.nesc.wvu.edu/smallflows.cfm

“The Watson Wick,” by Keith A. Lindauer,
“Watson on the Wick,” by Tom Watson, and
“How the Wick Works,” by Catherine Wanek.
The Last Straw, issue #28, Winter 1999/2000, pp. 28-31.
www.strawhomes.com

Online

www.oasisdesign.net
Managed by Art Ludwig, this site is a well-spring of information and products.

www.greywater.com
A great resource managed by Carl Lindstrom.

www.HarvestingRainwater.com
The Greywater Harvesting page has information on greywater-compatible soaps and detergents, how to make your own flow splitters, tax credits, suppliers of greywater-harvesting materials, and more.

www.ecological-engineering.com
Managed by David Del Porto, this site has information on composting toilets, washwater gardens, and ecological engineering.

“Residential Graywater Reuse Study,” June 2000, Water Conservation Alliance of Southern Arizona.
Study testing water and soil quality of unpermitted Arizona greywater systems and the landscapes reusing the greywater. Note: All Water CASA research is copyrighted and protected. Contact them at watercasa@cals.arizona.edu to access this publication.

Legality of greywater

Call local authorities for regulations in your area. The Graywater Policy Center on the Oasis Design website lists regulations of various states in the United States.

Arizona
Graywater Guidelines, a brochure published by the Water Conservation Alliance of Southern Arizona. Please note that all Water CASA brochures are copyrighted and protected.
watercasa.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Graywater_Guidelines-copy.pdf
Available here in Portuguese

New Mexico
Using Gray Water in New Mexico’s Residential Landscapes, a brochure published by the New Mexico Office of the State Engineer.
www.nmenv.state.nm.us/P2/documents/Gray_Water.pdf

Greywater-compatible soaps and detergents

Online information

www.HarvestingRainwater.com
Go to Greywater Harvesting page.

Suppliers

Check first to see if your local co-op or independently owned grocer carries the products below. Not only will you save on shipping costs, but you might be able to reduce packaging, too, by purchasing these products in bulk.

Oasis Soaps and Detergents
Scroll down on the following page to purchase Oasis laundry and dishwashing/multipurpose soaps by the gallon.
www.yourguidetogreen.com/store/home-garden/cleaning/cat_13.html

Bio Pac Cleaning Products
www.bio-pac.com

Greywater-Harvesting Stub Outs

Products

Jandy Valve Extension Shaft
Jandy Valve used to make a 30-inch extension shaft for its No Lube, Full-Port, 3-way valves. This shaft could greatly ease installation of below-floor greywater valves with handles easily accessible above the floor. I have had no luck obtaining these extension shafts/kits. I’m always told they have been discontinued, but I include the part numbers and link below if you’d like to request Jandy to resume production or if you’d like to make your own.
Jandy Space Saver Valve Mounting Bracket Kit in the Jandy Products 1999 Products and Parts Catalog (p. 12) includes:
– Mounting Bracket Kit Long (Black), part #3480 or Mounting Bracket Kit Standard (Black), part #3481
– Spa Knob Extension Shaft 30″, part #2894
– Decorator Handle
See pages 10 and 11 of the following link manatron.net/Pdf’s/JANDY%20MANUALS/valves.pdf

 

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XXIII (Chapter 12). Composting

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Let It Rot!: The Gardener’s Guide to Composting, by Stu Campbell. Storey Communications, 1990.

Backyard Composting: Your Complete Guide to Recycling Yard Clippings, by Harmonious Press, 1993.

 

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XXIV (Chapter 12). Composting Toilets

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Publications on Composting Human Waste

The Humanure Handbook: A Guide to Composting Human Manure, by Joseph Jenkins. Jenkins Publishing, 2005.
www.jenkinspublishing.com

The Composting Toilet System Book: A Practical Guide to Choosing, Planning and Maintaining Composting Toilet Systems, an Alternative to Sewer and Septic Systems, by David Del Porto and Carol Steinfeld. Center for Ecological Pollution Prevention, 2000.

Lifting the Lid: An Ecological Approach to Toilet Systems, by Peter Harper and Louise Halestrap. New Society Publications, 2001.

Liquid Gold: The Lore and Logic of Using Urine to Grow Plants, by Carol Steinfeld. Green Frigate Books, 2004.

A Community Guide to Environmental Health, by Jeff Conant and Pam Fadem. Heserian, 2008.

Guidelines on the Use of Urine and Faeces in Crop Production, by Håkan Jönsson, Anna Richert Stinzing, Björn Vinnerås, and Eva Salomon. Stockholm Environment Institute, 2004.
www.ecosanres.org/publications.htm

Composting Toilets, an EPA Technology Fact Sheet.
water.epa.gov/aboutow/owm/upload/2005_07_14_comp.pdf

To acquire building plans for the Minimus and Farallones Batch composting toilets (which are legal to build throughout the state of Queensland, Australia as the sole toilet system) contact Ray Flanagan at rayflanagan@nor.com.au.

The Toilet Papers, by Van der Ryn. Capra Press, 1978. A guide and resource for composting toilets.

Why Farmers are Flocking to Manure, by Gene Logsdon. A great article on the value of manure from livestock and humans.
www.theatlantic.com/food/archive/2010/12/why-farmers-are-flocking-to-manure/67292/1/

Owner-built composting toilets in Lismore, Australia: meeting the needs of users and regulators, Walker, S. & Davison, L. (2003), Proceedings of 2nd International Symposium on Ecological Sanitation, Lubeck, Germany, 7-11 April, pp. 345-348.
This technical sheet, prepared by Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia, as a part of the Septic Safe Program, provides generic information about composting toilets and contains a list of references for additional information about such systems. The waterless composting toilet (WCT) is one of a number of emerging technologies which address the ecological shortcomings of the standard water closet and its associated plumbing.

Online (in addition to above)

greywateraction.org/content/about-composting-toilets
greywateraction.org/projects/composting-toilets
Great resources from Greywater Action. The first link has an amazing array of excellent links to all things composting-toilet.

www.omick.net
Living Outside the Box. A wonderful website highlighting the on-going exploration of some practical aspects of simple, land-integrated living. David Omick and Pearl Mast offer the best dryland composting-toilet information and workshops I’ve come across.

www.appropedia.org/Ersson_rainwater_harvest_and_purification_(original)
This is a wonderful site documenting Ole and Maitri Ersson’s living experiments with composting toilets, rainwater harvesting systems, small houses, and more.

www.ecolotree.com
Information on using trees to help filter soil and water.

www.youtube.com/v/BLh-bAiddeQ&rel=1
Great video by Vishwanath of www.rainwaterclub.org on an ecosan composting toilet at a home in Bangalore, India.

www.docstoc.com/docs/34906537/Owner-built-Composting-Toilets-in-Lismore_-Australia_-meeting-the
This website allows you to view, or register to download, this study of 20 owner-built composting toilets built to three generic designs (the large continuous flow Minimus, the large Farallones Batch, and the small Barrel Batch) in the Lismore region, New South Wales, Australia.

www.allgov.com/news/unusual-news/austin-first-city-to-approve-humanure-toilet?news=839055
An article on the City of Austin, Texas, permitting homemade composting toilets.

spontaneousvegetation.net/humble-pile/
A great urban humanure art and action project in Chicago

www.oasisdesign.net/compostingtoilets/earthtoilet/index.htm
Orchard Toilets

www.northernstar.com.au/news/dr-leigh-davison-and-garry-scotts-working-lives-ha/1616230/
This is an article on one of the compost-toilet pioneers from Lismore, Australia, who legalized site-built compost toilets there (see Publications section above for another Lismore resource)

Organization

Sulabh International Social Service Organization
A Gandhian organization promoting the use of low-cost low flush and dry toilets from which the deposited material can be made into fertilizer for the growing of food crops and bio-gas for cooking and lighting (see the Technical Research and Training section of their website). They also have an enlightening toilet museum and do great work empowering the people of lower castes in India.
www.sulabhinternational.org

Publications on composting pet waste

“Design, Testing and Implementation of a Large-Scale Urban Dog Waste Composting Program,” by Leah Nemiroff and Judith Patterson.  Compost Science & Utilization, Vol. 15, No. 4, 237-242
whitelab.biology.dal.ca/ln/PDFs/dog_waste_final.pdf

 

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XXV (Epilogue). Community and Commons Activism

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Publications

Food Not Lawns: How to Turn Your Yard into a Garden and Your Neighborhood into a Community, by H.C. Flores. Chelsea Green Publishing Company, 2006.

The City Repair Project’s Placemaking Guidebook, the City Repair Project, 2006.
www.cityrepair.org

The Simple Act of Planting a Tree: Healing Your Neighborhood, Your City, and Your World, by TreePeople with Andy and Katie Lipkis, Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc., 1990. Chapter 5, “Taking It to the Streets,” has many great tips on galvanizing the public and getting the word out on an organized movement, be it tree planting, water harvesting, or the like.
www.treepeople.org/simple-act-planting-tree

The Great Neighborhood Book: A Do-It-Yourself Guide to Placemaking, by Jay Walljasper. New Society Publishers, 2007. A wonderful manual for building vibrant community one practical step at a time.

The Real Wealth of Nations: Creating a Caring Economics, by Riane Eisler. Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2007.

“Basins of Relations: Restoring a Watershed State of Being,” by Brock Dolman. Permaculture Activist, no. 47, Summer 2002, pp. 8-12.

Online

www.DunbarSpringNeighborhoodForesters.org

www.onthecommons.org
A web portal and blog that explores activism on behalf of the commons in all its variety. Commons include our water, solar access, national forests, public spaces, libraries, internet, and beyond.

www.neighbor-space.org
This organization helps community groups protect and secure their community garden or park from potential development, and works in concert with many private and public partners to preserve and expand community managed open space in Chicago.

www.energysavingcommunity.co.uk/communityprojectscategory
On this page, Energy Saving Community provides a collection of action-oriented  ideas from appointing local energy champions, to energy efficient community gardens, to community energy newtorks, and more.

 

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XXVI (Epilogue). Watershed Awareness and Restoration

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See Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1 Resources Appendix 6, and this website, for a more complete listing. Below are some additions.

Publications

Basins of Relations: A Citizen’s Guide to Protecting and Restoring Our Watersheds. Booklet, 20 pages. Water Institute, Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, 2007.
www.oaecwater.org

Online

Center for Watershed Protection
www.cwp.org

The Water Institute
www.oaecwater.org

 

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XXVII. Grants and Funding Resources

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Grant sources

Publications

Grassroots Grants: An Activist’s Guide to Grantseeking, by Andy Robinson. Jossey-Bass, 2004.

Organizations

Inquire at local city council or county supervisor offices for local grants.

Land and water agencies such as:

State Land Departments
These urban and community forestry grants can be used for the planting of trees in water harvesting earthworks, along with cistern-building and greywater-harvesting workshops. In Arizona search for the Arizona State Land Department, Forestry Division, Urban and Community Forestry Program’s Community Challenge Grant Program.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Forest Stewardship Incentive Program
Matches your expenses for erosion control, water harvesting earthworks, and revegetation projects on private land of 1,000 acres or less (some exceptions for parcels up to 5,000 acres) up to $10,000 per landowner per fiscal year.

State Fish & Game or Federal Fish & Wildlife
Services for wildlife habitat creation (supported by water harvesting strategies). Grants provide for work on private land and public land such as school grounds.

State Departments of Water Resources or Water Protection
Check these for watershed improvement and education grants. Can fund the creation of demonstration sites, workshops, and presentations.

Natural Conservation Resource Departments
These organizations provide free resources to help assess and improve your site’s watershed and wildlife habitat.

Federal government grants
The City of Portland, Oregon, has used grants from the website below to host a stormwater conference, create a sustainable stormwater street, and other stormwater related grants.
www.grants.gov

Grant writing

Grassroots Grants: An Activist’s Guide to Proposal Writing, by Andy Robinson. Chardon Press, 1996.

 

 

XXVIII. Water-Harvesting Financial Incentives/Programs

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United States

U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Standards
LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. Buildings that meet these standards cost far less to maintain than conventional buildings, and they have higher market value. So progressive governments and builders are requiring that their buildings be built for LEED certification. For example the City of Austin, Texas, requires all new facilities to be built to LEED Silver criteria or better. Water-harvesting systems count towards LEED certification.
www.usgbc.org/leed/leed_main.asp

Arizona

State Income Tax Credit
Up to a $200 per home state income tax credit can be claimed by builders who install greywater systems or at least greywater stub-outs (capped-off greywater drain pipes that can be hooked up later) in the construction of new homes. The homeowners hooking up and using these greywater systems can receive a state income tax credit of up to $1,000 per home to cover 25% of the greywater system’s hardware costs. Rainwater harvesting systems can be covered by the credit too, if they are integrated with the greywater harvesting system. Examples include earthworks and plantings that harvest both rainwater and greywater. From the website below, click on “credit pre-certification” on the left hand side of the home page; then click on “gray water conservation tax credit.”
www.azdor.gov

Oregon

Portland’s Downspout Disconnect Program
This program disconnects household roof-gutter downspouts from the combined sewer/stormwater system, then redirects the roof runoff to irrigate the landscape with the rainwater. The work is done for free by the City, or you can get a $53 reimbursement if you do it yourself. More than 42,000 homeowners have participated, removing over 942 million gallons of roof water per year from the combined sewer/stormwater system.
www.portlandonline.com/bes/index.cfm?c=43081

Texas

City of Austin Water Conservation Program
Distributes over 250 rain barrels per month to homeowners at a subsidized cost, and provides rebates for the installation of approved cistern systems. Commercial/industrial properties can receive rebates up to $40,000 for the installation of rainwater harvesting and greywater systems. New commercial facilities must install a separate irrigation meter costing between $5,000 and $25,000 unless they can provide 100% of all outdoor water needs from alternate water sources such as rain, greywater, and air conditioning condensate. See pp. 54-55 of online document:
www.twdb.texas.gov/publications/brochures/conservation/doc/RainwaterHarvestingManual_3rdedition.pdf

State Exemption
Exempts all water harvesting and greywater systems from state sales tax and property tax. See page 53 of online document:
www.twdb.texas.gov/publications/brochures/conservation/doc/RainwaterHarvestingManual_3rdedition.pdf

 

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XXVIX. Water Efficiency/Conservation

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American Water Works Association
www.awwa.org/waterwiser

H2O Use.org
Home tour, ways to save energy, calculate your water budget, and more.
www.h2ouse.org

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
www.epa.gov/watersense/our_water/why_water_efficiency.html

 

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XXX. Human-Powered Pumps & Hand-Dug Wells

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Note: I list the following as other means to access water harvested within the soil. But use such strategies only if you are also harvesting water with earthworks in order to give back, or deposit, more water into the system than you take out, or withdraw, with pumps and wells. In addition, the smaller, human-powered scale is more likely to access shallow-harvested water sustainably, rather than unsustainably mine deep fossil water.

Publications

How To Make a Rope-and-Washer Pump, by Robert Lambert. Practical Action Publishing (formerly Intermediate Technology Publications), 1989.

Hand Dug Wells and Their Construction, by S.B. Watt and W. E. Wood. Practical Action Publishing (formerly Intermediate Technology Publications), 1979.

 

Online

Bicycle-powered water pumps—Google “bicycle-powered water pumps.”

Human-powered treadle pumps—Google “treadle pumps.”

Design for the Other 90%
This website/show at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum highlights life-enhancing, practical, low-cost products designed for the 5.8 billion people of low income on this planet. These include bamboo treadle pumps, the LifeStraw water filter, the UV Bucket water filter (wbi.worldbank.org/developmentmarketplace/idea/uv-buckets-disinfect-water-rural-mexico), Potters for Peace ceramic water filter, International Development Enterprises India’s 10,000-liter plastic water-storage bag, and more.
www.cooperhewitt.org/tags/design-other-90

 

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The Umbrella: Summer 2020

THE UMBRELLA: A catch-all of resources, events, media, and more from Brad Lancaster In this time of Covid-19 and spending more time at home to be safe, I’ve been grateful for the solace, inspiration, and bountiful sustenance my water-harvesting gardens, landscape, and neighborhood forest has provided me, my family, friends, and neighbors. Record summer heat […]

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