Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond by Brad Lancaster

Archive for the 'Drops in a Bucket Blog' Category

Growing the Soil-Carbon Sponge by Tweaking Trails, Irrigation Line Protection, & Erosion-Control to Harvest Rainwater, Soil, & Seed

By Brad Lancaster
www.HarvestingRainwater.com

 

In 2018 and 2019 I had the pleasure to work with Rob Kater and crew of Native Resource International to incorporate stealth water- and soil-harvesting strategies into an expansion of the Boyce Thompson Arboretum with the Wallace Desert Garden collection that was being transplanted from Scottsdale, Arizona to the Arboretum in Superior, Arizona where average annual rainfall is 18 inches per year.

It was a massive project with hundreds of full-size specimens of trees, shrubs, and cacti being planted—many on steep slopes. The resulting disturbance from the large equipment used to dig the planting holes and transplant the new specimens on the slopes was significant. More disturbance came with the creation and expansion of trail systems and irrigation lines throughout the collection.

Rob brought me in to integrate passive water harvesting and more. On-site rock was abundant. So, I worked with Rob’s crews to create Bill Zeedyk-inspired sheet flow spreaders, one-rock dams, rolling dips, rock-mulch rundowns, and hybrids of all of the above that would spread out and infiltrate runoff flows that otherwise would’ve focused into erosive rills and gullies. Though to be clear, while I guided that work, it was the Native Resources International crews that did the work. They were incredible! Extremely hard working and hungry to learn new strategies and practices. I only came to the site a number of days to mark out and instruct on strategy locations, construction and seeding techniques; and give feedback on work done. The crews worked for weeks.

It was a great opportunity to get these practices into a public site with an educational mission, and to work with a company that could incorporate this water- and soil-harvesting approach into many other projects and contexts.

Sheet flow spreaders
Half-moon-shaped media lunas or sheet flow-spreaders were used on contour to slow, spread, and infiltrate runoff flows across the landscape, and stabilize new plantings and downstream trail borders. Often, we were able to increase their function by also placing them on contour over sections of irrigation lines running to the transplanted collection specimens. This way the irrigation lines were also well protected and would not be washed out and exposed by runoff (in some locations there was no soil beneath the irrigation lines, just bedrock).

One rock-high sheet-flow spreaders, just after construction, April 2018. Orange whiskers mark the contour line. Largest rock in structure placed, and anchored in trench on that contour line—sloping downslope face to create a gentle slope rather than a steep cliff-like face. This reduces the chance of an erosive scour where water overflows the structure. Native grass seed was sown throughout the structures.
Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Blue flow arrows show how runoff flow will be spread out by the sheet-flow spreaders. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Vegetative response to the sheet flow spreaders one year later, April 2019. I was thrilled. Lots of soil and organic matter captured and generated.
Though invasive red broom grass [Bromus rubens] (right side of photo) germinated along with the native grass (left side of photo). This red broom is growing throughout the site, including well above the water harvesting installations, so its seed was clearly abundant before our work.
Photo: Brad Lancaster

Native grass seed was sown within these and all other structures in order to jump start the vegetative living component of structures. The vegetation stabilizes the structure with its network of roots, increases water-holding and runoff-slowing capacity, builds soil, sequesters carbon, and creates more wildlife habitat. Thus, we grow the soil-carbon sponge.

 

 

 

Diversion swale/rolling dip hybrids

Diversion swale/rolling dip hybrids were also used to divert runoff flows off trails, to sheet flow spreaders that then calmly and productively distribute the diverted runoff to more downslope vegetation. The challenge of any trail, road, or driveway across a slope is that the trail can very easily intercept relatively calm, shallow, spread out sheet flow runoff coming from the slope above, then speed up, deepen, and channelize the flow—resulting in the trail becoming an eroding water channel, while dehydrating the slope below that no longer receives the runoff it did pre-trail. Our strategies aimed to keep pre-disturbance sheet flows intact, and enhance those flows by slowing them down and infiltrating a larger volume into the soil throughout the watershed.

While it is common to see diversion structures across hiking trails that drain water off the trail, what is typically lacking is consciously locating the diversion/drain where it will perform the maximum benefits for the landscape it waters. Don’t just drain the trail, but do so in a way that maximizes the good it does to the landscape it drains to by maximizing the slowing, spreading, and infiltrating of the drained water into soil and vegetative life. We spread out the drained water, rather than concentrating it (which would increase its erosive potential). With the work at the Arboretum, our goal was to always follow the principles laid out by Bill Zeedyk in his book Water Harvesting from Low Standard Rural Roads, but in this case in the context of dirt hiking trails, rather than dirt roads. We especially focused on the principle to always look for the location with the best chance to drain a road or trail. The chance providing maximum good.

 

A diversion swale/rolling dip hybrid across the path diverts runoff captured by the trail to a sheet flow spreader and vegetation off trail, April 2018. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Blue flow arrows show how runoff flow will be diverted off trail, into a rock sheet flow spreader, then spread out to more downslope vegetation Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Vegetative response to the sheet flow spreaders two years later, April 2020. No erosion on the path. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Sheet flow spreader/rock-mulch rundown hybrids
Sheet flow spreader/sheet flow collector/rock-mulch rundown hybrids were used on the downslope edges of trails and transplants to stabilize both. Trails were regularly dipped to drain water off the path and over the structures. Tops of structures were kept lower than the edge of path so they would allow runoff to spill off the path and over the structure, as opposed to the structures keeping water on the trail.

Sheet flow spreader/rock-mulch rundown/sheet flow collector hybrids under construction, April 2018. Blue flow arrows show how runoff will be slowed and spread out. Paths will be regularly dipped to drain water off the path and over the structures. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Vegetative response to the structures one year later, April 2019. Native grass seed was sown in structures at time of construction.
Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Sheet flow spreader on downslope edge of path under construction, June 2018. Note that this is not complete. The downslope rock is not anchored into a footer trench, and the slope/angle of the downslope rock is too steep—its cliff-like face could encourage scour when water flows over the structure. Also, the path above needs to be dipped slightly to ensure more water flows off the path and over the structure. All that work was completed after this photo was taken. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Vegetative response one year later, April 2019. Blue arrows denote runoff flow. Along with the path being dipped to drain more runoff water over the structure, there is a gradual diversion berm across the path behind the bush on the right—a rolling dip—so no water can continue to flow down the footpath. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

One-rock dams
Many one-rock dams were used across drainages with a wonderful vegetative response. They were also used to cover and protect irrigation lines running across drainages.

One-rock dam complete in center of photo, rock-mulch rundowns stabilizing downslope side of new plantings, and irrigation lines yet to be covered and protected with one-rock dams and sheet flow spreaders, April 2018. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Great vegetative response one year after implementation, April 2019. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Vegetative response two years after implementation, April 2020. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Rerouting paths for people to enhance the health of paths for water
Since foot traffic impedes stabilizing, vegetative growth; sections of trails were rerouted out of water drainages so the drainages could readily revegetate. The trail crossings of the drainages were then stabilized on the downstream side with one-rock dams.

Brown arrow denotes footpath running down water drainage before the footpath was redirected out of the waterway, April 2018. Blue arrow denotes water flow. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Brown arrow denotes footpath redirected out of the waterway, May 2018. A one-rock dam stabilizes the downslope side of the footpath where it crosses the waterway. Additional one-rock dams stabilize the waterway, while also protecting irrigation lines running below them. Irrigation lines only go to the large transplanted trees and shrubs in landscape. Blue arrows denote runoff water flow. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

May 2018 view without the flow arrows. I’m pointing to a well-backfilled one-rock dam that protects an irrigation line below it. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Vegetative response one year later, April 2019. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Vegetative response two years after implementation, April 2020. More perennials getting established. Photo: Brad Lancaster

 

Go and check out the work

The work was done along the African Deserts Loop and Sonoran Desert Loop trails. And far more work was done than is represented in the few photos I’ve shared here. But as I mentioned at the beginning, the strategies are stealth. They were meant to disappear into the landscape as they were built to look natural. Their forms and placement were all inspired by observation of the natural flow of water and sediment. Besides, the structures themselves are not that important. What is important is what is the effect of the structures and the overall work. We can keep learning by observing the changing effects over time, fix/maintain if and where needed, and evolve our practices in future projects so they will help regenerate more life in a way that gives back more than it takes.

 

 

Parking lot runoff harvest potential

As a post script, early in the project Rob asked me to draw up a quick plan for how the landscape within and around the Arboretum’s parking lot could be retrofitted to harvest more rainfall and runoff from parking lot, roads, and buildings (you can see the plan below).

Plan for how more parking lot, road, and building runoff could be harvested higher within the Arboretum’s watershed.

 

The parking lot currently sheds 50,000 gallons of rainwater for every 1-inch of rain that falls on it. All that flow currently flows through some of the Arboretum’s gardens before overflowing into Queen Creek. It is great that some of that water is harvested within the gardens, but far more could be harvested than is currently occurring; which would help recharge the Arboretum’s aquifer—essential to ensure that groundwater extraction does not exceed replenishment.

Water-harvesting demonstration garden currently in place at the Arboretum

 

Should the resources and will arise at the Arboretum, perhaps some or all of the water harvesting retrofit could be implemented. Though, it is always less expensive and easiest to do so at the time of the initial design and construction, rather than a retrofit.

 

 

 

For more info on how to design and build the strategies discussed here and plenty of others:

Check out the newly revised, award-winning, full-color books Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond available at deep discount direct from me, the author, at https://www.harvestingrainwater.com/shop/

Cool Yourself, Your Neighborhood, and the Planet with the Water-Harvesting Soil-Carbon Sponge

by Brad Lancaster
www.HarvestingRainwater.com

The following is reproduced  from “Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, 2nd Edition.”

Life supported by water-harvesting earthworks mitigates climate change and weather extremes

The availability of more water within and beside water-harvesting earthworks grows more life, which in turn shades, cools, and shelters more of the Earth’s surface from intense sun, wind, flooding, and other extremes. There is a powerful, beneficial partnership between the hydrologic cycle circulating life-giving water and the carbon-based, soil-building,  carbon-cycling life in the soil—known as the soil-carbon sponge. According to climate scientist and soil microbiologist Walter Jehne, the vast majority of the heat dynamics and hydrologic cooling on Earth is governed by our planet’s hydrologic cycle.1 And that cycle, coupled with the soil-carbon sponge, helps maintain a stable climate on our planet such that the amount of heat released to space is equal to incoming heat from the sun—though our planet has been holding onto more heat than it releases since about 1750 due to human-influenced climate change and the destruction of the soil-carbon sponge.2

Figure 1. What world do you want to live in? The one on the left or the right? The condition of the soil-carbon sponge controls the fate of rainfall and affects climate. Adapted from: “Recognizing the Soil Sponge” by Peter Donovan, SoilCarbonCoalition.org

 

By understanding the synergy between the hydrologic cycle and the soil-carbon sponge, we can design our sites to beneficially collaborate with these natural processes. Well-vegetated soil absorbs and reradiates less heat to the atmosphere than non-vegetated bare earth. Evapotranspiration of water from this vegetation results in even more cooling because the latent heat/energy needed to change liquid water to water vapor is absorbed from solar radiation without increasing the air temperature. Water vapor rises into the atmosphere and collects around cloud “seeds”—precipitation nuclei—ideally tiny hydroscopic microbes or bacteria that grew in the stomata cavities of plant leaves and then were released into the air (so you could say rain is a microbial symbiotic process).3 The resulting clouds further shade the earth before the water vapor turns back into liquid rain drops, releasing energy/heat back into space. Rain from the clouds cools and rehydrates the earth’s surface, where soil-building, carbon-based life—the soil-carbon sponge—sequesters atmospheric carbon and rapidly infiltrates the water, which in turn supports more plant growth (figure 1). And more atmospheric moisture is invited into the area’s sky as the rainstorms release atmospheric pressure, creating a moisture-welcoming low-pressure system, rather than a moisture-deflecting high-pressure system.

The clouds created by the process described above are very different from haze, which is created by water vapor collecting around airborne dust particles, aerosols, and pollutants. Heat reflected off the earth’s surface up into the air is reflected back down to the earth’s surface by haze—the planet-heating greenhouse effect. Haze does not generate rain, so haze lingers much longer, and unlike clouds, which disperse after a storm enabling rising heat to escape to space (especially felt at night), haze does not disperse, but instead continues to trap heat in the atmosphere.

As Peter Donovan states in his essay “Recognizing the Soil Sponge,”

“Deforestation, fire, and agriculture have tended to move landscapes leftward (figure 1), baring soil, increasing fine dust particles that nucleate haze but not rain, planting short-season annuals, shortening the length of the green season and the sugary plant root exudates that feed soil porosity and aggregation. Bare soil heats up, radiates, and some of this heat is re-radiated back from greenhouse gases. Regular fire or tillage bares soil and prevents the soil carbon sponge from developing. High-pressure domes over large expanses of hot bare ground repel rain. These landscapes multiply heat and aridity.

On the right (figure 1), the formation of high-albedo rain clouds from abundant transpiration with bacterial precipitation nuclei helps recycle water locally, while the pressure drop from large-scale condensation drives the biotic pump, which brings in moist air from the oceans. When the clouds clear, heat can escape. Abundant plants harvest atmospheric moisture as dew (figure 2). More solar energy is dissipated upwards by transpiration, and less by sensible heat [heat that changes temperature]. These landscapes multiply rainfall and cooling…

Figure 2. Fog-harvesting vegetation. Note the puddles beneath the trees whose leaves the fog condensed into water drops, which then dropped to the soil and pavement below. Photo credit: Erin O’ Neil, SeedsAndStones.blog. Search “Fog Harvesting” at HarvestingRainwater.com for more

 

…Carbon embodies the solar-powered circle of life, the great biogeochemical carbon cycle powered by photosynthesis and governed by the metabolisms and choices of zillions of self-motivated living organisms, most of them microbes. Though the work of carbon cycling is tiny compared to the work of water cycling, carbon cycling wields enormous leverage with its complex and transformational chemistry, leading to a coupled carbon and water cycling that governs the balance between incoming solar radiation and outgoing long wave radiation. In the soil, the decomposition of living things forms the soil-carbon sponge, which can resiliently sustain plant life, affect the earth’s hydrology and heat balance, and may give humans the near-term leverage we need to avert catastrophic climate change, restore hydrologic function, maintain our economies and civilizations, and maintain and enhance human health.”4

Leaves are called “leaves” because we are supposed to leave them
Organic matter is food for the life of the soil-carbon sponge. So rather than rake or vacuum leaf drop out from under plants, why not leave it? This is made easier if we plant within or beside sunken water-harvesting earthworks or rain gardens, because organic matter—like water—will flow to the low spots. So go ahead and sweep fallen leaves off your patio, but reinvest those leaves in adjoining vegetated basins.

Depleting the living sponge by vacuuming a site’s nutrient-rich “waste” of fallen leaves and organic matter. Photo: Jenny Leis

 

Enhancing the living sponge by recycling nutrients and organic matter. Prunings are cut up and used as mulch, along with fallen leaves, for the plant from which they came. In a healthy system there is no such thing as waste. Photo: Brad Lancaster

Increase available rainfall by increasing the catchment area from which you harvest the water
That organic matter will more quickly decompose and be consumed by the soil life if it, and the soil, is moist. Because water is a lubricant of exchange—in this case an exchange of nutrients. The more runoff we collect from adjoining hardscapes within our water-harvesting basins, the more lubricant of exchange we’ll harvest; and the more we can grow the vegetative and soil-carbon sponge that can then shade, cool, and even seed those hardscapes.

Available rainfall is captured within an infiltration basin, then doubled by also directing runoff (turned into runon) to the next basin, then tripled by doubling the catchment area draining to the basin. Runon is right on!

 

To absorb this in song form listen to:
Rainwater Spiritual, by Gabrielle Pietrangelo of Silver Thread Trio

 

For more info
Check out the newly revised, award-winning, full-color books Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond available at deep discount direct from the author at https://www.harvestingrainwater.com/shop/

 

REFERENCES

1. Jehne, Walter, “Regenerate Earth” http://www.globalcoolingearth.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Regenerate-Earth-Paper-Walter-Jehne.pdf, accessed 2-8-2019

2. Jehne, Walter, “Restoring Water Cycles to Naturally Cool Climates and Reverse Global Warming,” presentation, November 2016, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K4ygsdHJjdI

3. Ibid.

4. Donovan, Peter, “Recognizing the Soil Carbon Sponge” https://soilcarboncoalition.org/recognizing-soil-carbon-sponge/ , accessed 2-8-2019

Simple & Effective Gravity-fed Greywater Harvesting Systems Legalized in Utah

—and How You Can Help Make Such Change Where You Are

By Brad Lancaster
www.HarvestingRainwater.com

Utah has recently revised its rules for greywater harvesting systems to allow for residential households to permit, install, and use simple, affordable, and effective branched drain gravity-fed systems discharging to naturally-filtering mulched and vegetated basins in the landscape.

This should greatly benefit Utah, which is the second driest state in the U.S., and has the second highest water-use-per-person rate in the county.1

While advocating for the greywater rule change, Utah activists Ros Brain McCann and Jeffrey Adams pointed out in numerous presentations to state and county health officials that if every household in Utah were to harvest all its greywater (to offset other on-site irrigation uses of water) the greywater could potentially create a “new” water source (in the form of the harvested greywater) in the state equaling 68,000 to 98,500 acre-feet of water per year.

An acre-foot is the amount of water it takes to cover an acre of land with a one-foot depth of water. One acre-foot = 325,851 gallons2

 

The math:
The average household of 3 people generates 25,000 – 36,600 gallons of greywater per year+

This represents 1 acre-foot of “new” water supply per every 9-13 households using greywater (assuming they use all greywater to offset other on-site irrigation uses)

With 866,770 households* = 68,000 – 98,500 AF of potential!

 

+Ludwig – Creating an Oasis with Greywater
*http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/49000.html

 

 

Greywater, dark greywater, and blackwater
Greywater is lightly used water going down the drains of household showers, bathtubs, laundry, and bathroom sinks, which can be redirected to your landscape and reused, thereby transforming that “waste” water into a free “resource” for irrigating your landscape.

Kitchen sink drain water is considered either dark greywater or blackwater (classification changes depending on the entity classifying the water) due to the presence of food scraps, oils, and grease and the resulting bacteria which necessitate different strategies for reuse than greywater. For a kitchen sink drain water reuse system legal in Arizona, see “Sizing and Implementing a Kitchen Resource Drain (KRD) in Arizona, Code Clarification, and Recommended Changes to the Code” in Appendix 3 of Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, 2nd Edition.

Toilet drain water is coined blackwater due to human waste, and high amounts of resulting bacteria such as E. coli which makes it much more challenging to treat than greywater.

 

Comparing Utah’s old rules to the new rules
Under Utah’s old rules, the greywater permit cost $350, and you were required to install a system with a minimum 250-gallon surge tank and pump. This storage of the greywater in tanks is problematic, because when you do so—the greywater goes septic, bacteria populations soar, and the tanked greywater becomes blackwater—which smells horrible and is more difficult to safely treat and reuse than the much more benign greywater. Tanks and pumps also significantly increase the cost, maintenance, and potential failure of the system.

Under Utah’s new rules, the Tier 1 greywater in southeast Utah costs $100 for a gravity-fed branched-drain greywater system discharging into mulched and vegetated basins in the landscape (cost may vary depending on health department district in Utah). No tank or pump required.

But the new rules do NOT, as of yet, allow the Laundry to Landscape (L2L) system.

For a description of the rule change see Utah State University Extension Sustainability’s Graywater Systems

KZMU radio story on revising the greywater laws in Utah:

https://www.kzmu.org/kzmu-news-thursday-november-7-2019/

Utah Center for Water Efficient Landscaping, Youtube power point presentation:
Greywater in Utah – Roslynn McCann and Jeff Adams, June 2020

 

How a few people led the way for state-wide change

After taking a 2014 Watershed Management Group water harvesting certification course in Albuquerque, NM taught by Brad Lancaster, Catlow Shipek, and Jeffrey Adams—Ros Brain McCann, Sustainable Communities Specialist at Utah State University, returned home determined to set up a greywater harvesting system in the straw bale house she was building in Moab, Utah. 

But she was soon frustrated by the Utah greywater rules at that time, which were dysfunctional and prohibitive to the point that not a single residence in the state had ever applied for a permit. The rules did not allow for affordable, easy-to-use and easy-to-maintain gravity-fed branched drain greywater systems (which were legal in Arizona and New Mexico) that she had learned about in the water harvesting course.

So, Ros approached Orion Rogers of the Southeast Utah Health Department and shared with him the simpler, safer, less expensive, and more effective systems she’d just learned about in the water harvesting course. Orion was intrigued, as the gravity-fed greywater systems looked simpler to him, and they’d be affordable to the many low-income households of Grand county; whereas the costly and complex systems permitable at the time in Utah were not affordable.3

Orion asked Ros to present her idea at a 2015 conference of the Utah Environmental Health Association where all Utah’s health departments would be represented. But just before the meeting Ros had complications with a failed pregnancy and asked Jeffrey Adams—one of the instructors from Ros’ water-harvesting course and owner of the ecological design company TerraSophia LLC,—to take her place for the presentation. The presentation intrigued many of the health department officials and they allowed Ros to apply for an experimental greywater harvesting permit so her house could become a pilot project, which was followed a few years later by another low-income straw bale house being built by Community Rebuilds in Moab. (After I taught a 2013 water-harvesting course for Community Rebuilds, they have been installing greywater-harvesting stubouts in their homes since 2014 waiting for the day affordable greywater harvesting would be legalized.

Jeffrey Adams designed Ros’s greywater-harvesting system and designed and built the second permitted system being sure to properly size both for each site’s soil type and percolation rate, the expected household output of greywater, and the residents’ projected irrigation needs.

Jeff also excavated the greywater-harvesting basins and did some of the basin bank-stabilizing rockwork for Ros’ system. Ros and her husband Dan installed the plumbing, planting, and the rest of the rockwork.

The system is beautiful and productive—an outstanding example for the community and the state—as it is well stewarded by Ros and Dan (see figures 1 and 2).

 

Figure 1. Passive rainwater and greywater-irrigated (from shower and laundry) fruit trees and understory plants in the north-side landscape of Roslynn Brain McCann’s family home, Moab, Utah. Photo credit: Roslynn Brain McCann

 

Figure 12. Passive rainwater and greywater-irrigated (from shower and laundry) fruit trees and understory plants in the north-side landscape of Roslynn Brain McCann’s family home, Moab, Utah. Photo credit: Roslynn Brain McCann

 

Ros’ site has had a big impact. She enthusiastically gives tours when Orion and many others ask. Through first-hand observation, health officials immediately understood the simplicity and effectiveness of her greywater system. And health officials from all of Utah’s counties toured Ros’ system just before voting to approve the greywater rule change that went into effect January 1, 2020.

Now that the plants of Ros’ greywater harvesting basins are well established, she does not need to apply supplemental irrigation. Passively harvested rainwater and household greywater take care of all the plants’ water needs, and those plants are now providing a cherished food source for her household, ranging from cherries to currants. No virgin drinking water straight from the municipal water supply is used to irrigate her system.

She has also found it possible to continue running her greywater system throughout winter and hard freezes (household greywater leaves the house at the home’s interior temperature – well above freezing).

This is a great example of the power of a few striving for positive change. Ros had no experience or comfort in changing policy when all this began in 2014. But since the state policy did not allow her to better manage water on her site in an affordable way that would also benefit the larger community, she decided the policy had to be changed. And this process has taught her that anyone can make such change when you pull the right team of people together.

Though Orion adds, “It will likely take longer than you think. It took three years longer than I expected. But you just keep picking away at it. Have persistence. Things happen, such as staffing turn overs that put things on hold. It’s not so much changing minds, but getting through all the committees and reviews, clarifying language in the rules, sharing information, and clarifying language in the rules, sharing information, and getting everyone on same page. And in this case, it wasn’t just writing in rules for the branched drain system, but reworking the entire greywater rule.”4

Orion then pointed out that there are still others to thank, for example, Orion’supervisor first took the branched drain greywater system to the appropriate committee, then Orion took over when his supervisor retired and Orion got promoted.

 

The change is spreading

The folks behind the Arroyo Crossing housing development in Moab were inspired by Ros’ system, toured it, and are now requiring greywater-harvesting stubouts in all the development’s homes, and are giving preference to builders that include fully functional greywater systems in the homes they build.

More support also comes in the form of Ros’ husband, Dan, who is a builder/craftsman and home designer who works for an architectural firm designing for Arroyo Crossing, as he too can share his experience of what works.

 

Though change has also been slowed by Covid-19

Each health department district must opt in to administer the new greywater rule, but as they are all also currently dealing with the response to Covid-19, adoption is going slower than it otherwise would. Nonetheless, so far, three have done so in SE Utah, five in Central Utah, and two in NE Utah—which means the majority of the health department districts in state have now opted in to administer the new greywater rule as of this writing.4

Note that the revised greywater rules have not yet been updated on Utah’s Department of Environmental Quality website because they are building a new one. Thus the new rules are not easily googled…

 

Are greywater harvesting rules in your state prohibitive?

If so, use the precedent of other states to improve your state’s rules
The state of Arizona helped set some of the groundwork for Utah’s change by, in 2001, being the first state in the nation to allow tank-less, gravity-fed greywater-harvesting systems directing the greywater to mulched and vegetated basins in the landscape. Arizona then improved, simplified, and clarified the regulations with additional revisions adopted January 1, 2018.

For the full story, see the section “How Safe, Effective, and Accessible Greywater Harvesting Was Legalized and Incentivized in Arizona” in Chapter 12 of Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, 2nd Edition by Brad Lancaster.

Utah has made tremendous progress with its recent rule revisions, and I would argue that there is still room to make it significantly easier and less expensive for residents to safely harvest household greywater, such as what Arizona has done with a no cost permit that it is automatically granted without inspection if you follow the state’s 13 common sense guidelines.

What’s more, Arizona also allows the harvest of kitchen sink dark greywater (but for this you apply, and pay, for a permit)—for that story and how-to info see “Sizing and Implementing a Kitchen Resource Drain (KRD) in Arizona, Code Clarification, and Recommended Changes to the Code” in Appendix 3 of Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, 2nd Edition.

Greywater is also more accessible in Arizona because the state allows for the homeowner to design their own system, whereas Utah only allows those who have both a Level 1 certification for Soil Evaluation and Percolation Testing and a Level 2 certification for Design, Operation, Inspection, and Maintenance of Conventional On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems to design a greywater system.

Though information or methods on how to design a greywater harvesting system for irrigation purposes—so the greywater output is in balance with the water needs of associated plantings—is not currently part of the certification curriculum.4,5 Depending on who you speak to, some may say the primary focus of the Utah code is safe disposal and treatment of greywater, while others may say it’s the safe reuse and treatment of greywater.

Info on how to design your greywater system’s plantings and their water needs in balance with your estimated greywater output is available in:

• The greywater harvesting chapter of Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, 2nd Edition
How to Create an Oasis with Greywater by Art Ludwig
The Water-Wise Home by Laura Allen

One way of educating and incentivizing the public and designers on simpler and more effective greywater systems can include providing free courses on the topic. These are required for those applying for the $1,000 greywater harvesting rebate in the city of Tucson, AZ.

 

Nothing is perfect, but we get closer as we keep striving to improve

Arizona’s rule revisions along with those in Utah, New Mexico, California, west Texas, and more can all be inspirations and guides for other states to do likewise or even better. Arizona and New Mexico rules are very similar, while California’s are somewhat more restrictive. Such diverse examples, can help mitigate other states’ policy makers’ fears and lack of knowledge.

When you approach local policy makers to inquire on how to evolve current rules, contact policy makers at both the state, county, and municipal level in multiple departments to see who is receptive, then work with those who are receptive to forge a plan to address the concerns of those who are not currently receptive.

 

For more info

For more on how to safely, effectively, and affordably harvest greywater and other free on-site waters check out the newly revised, award-winning, full-color books Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond available at deep discount direct from the author at https://www.harvestingrainwater.com/shop/

 

 

REFERENCES

1.https://conservewater.utah.gov/pdf/MaterialsResources/Brochures/M&I%20Water%20Use%20Brouchure.pdf

2. Greywater presentation by Jeffrey Adams of Terrasophia LLC and Dr. Rosylnn Brain McCann, Sustainable Communities Specialist Utah State University

3. Personal communication with Roslynn Brain McCann on 11-8-2019

4. Personal communication with Orion Rogers on 8-17-20

5. Personal communication with Jeff Adams on 8-13-20.

 

 

Revised and Expanded List of Plants for Chickens in the Sonoran Desert

by Brad Lancaster
www.HarvestingRainwater.com

Why buy all food or materials for shade structures for you chickens when you can grow many of these resources and more?

Plants native to your area and your site’s microclimates are the best since they are best adapted to your local conditions, and won’t need supplemental irrigation once established. Passively harvest rainwater and/or greywater for them and the won’t just survive – they will thrive!

The chickens will let you know what they like and don’t like. I bring them cuttings of a plant to taste (figure 1). If they like it, I’ll plant one or two for them in their chicken yard (figure 2). But I also fence the plant so the chickens won’t eat it to the ground and kill it. Instead, the chickens just eat what grows through the fencing. As the plants grow they eventually develop a shading/sheltering canopy as well. And the chickens nibble on and prune the growth that droops down to their height.

Figure 1. Adolescent chickens eating wolfberry leaves

 

Figure 2. The quailbush is fenced so chickens won’t eat it all. This way they just eat what grows through the fence. They especially love the new growth.

Some plants such as the mostly thornless nopal cactus pads will be chewed on by the chickens, but they like it better if I cut up the pads into bite-sized cubes (figure 3). This is a great food in our hot summers as it helps cool the birds and hydrate them.

Figure 3. Young chickens eating nopal cactus pad cut up into cubes

You can also consult books on the ethnobotanical (human) uses of your region’s native plants or your local Game and Fish department or books that list what plants local chicken-like birds—such as quail and wild turkeys—like to eat. Most likely, chickens will like to eat those plants too. An example of one such book I’ve used is American Wildlife and Plants: A Guide to Wildlife Food Habits by Martin, Alexander C., Herbert S. Herbert, and Arnold L. Nelson  New York:  Dover Publications, 1951.
Chickens also like to eat most of the plant foods we eat.

 

Click here for the revised and expanded list of plants for chickens in the Sonoran Desert

 

 

And for more info on how to freely irrigate your chicken plants with the rain and other free on-site waters such as greywater and air-conditioning condensate check out the revised, full-color editions of my books…

New Full-Color Editions of Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond Win Book Awards

The new full-color, revised editions of Brad Lancaster’s books Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volumes 1 and 2 are Independent Press Award winners.

In addition, Volume 1 is a semi-finalist for a Chanticleer International Book Award, and Volume 2 is a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Award Montaigne Medal.

Volume 1, 3rd Edition won the Independent Press Award in the Home & Garden book category
https://www.independentpressaward.com/2020winners

Volume 2, 2nd Edition won the Independent Press Award in the Green book category.
https://www.independentpressaward.com/2020winners

Volume 1, 3rd Edition is a semi-finalist for the Chanticleer International Book Awards (CIBAs) for Instructional and Insightful Non-Fiction.
https://www.chantireviews.com/…/the-semi-finalists-announc…/

Volume 2, 2nd Edition is a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Award Montaigne Medal – awarded to the most thought-provoking titles each year.
http://www.hofferaward.com/Montaigne-Medal-finalists.html

Get your signed copies today direct from me, the author, at deep discount at:
https://www.harvestingrainwater.com/shop/

Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1, 3rd Edition now available in E-BOOK format

I just released the new, full-color, 3rd edition of Volume 1 in E-BOOK format.

This makes the book far more affordable for those outside the U.S., since there are no insanely costly international shipping costs.

This is also great for those who travel near and far, as it won’t take any additional physical space if uploaded to your phone, tablet, e-reader, and/or computer. I love having this book uploaded to my phone. Thus all of its incredible information and imagery is always in my pocket and right at my fingertips. And I can pull it out and get a concept across to a client, co-worker, or student at any time with one of the book’s illustrations, and assess a site’s water budget with the handy calculations.

 

Bonuses in this ebook edition:
Since the ebook does not have the page limitations and paper costs of a print book, this ebook edition includes the following, which is not in the print edition:

• Full, live-linked, List of Illustrations
• Expanded calculations appendix
• Full worksheets appendix
• Additional, revised images
• The ability to search any term, concept, or strategy in the book – far more comprehensive than a printed index

Additionally, I put a lot more time and money into the production of this ebook than most do, in order to make for a more pleasant reading experience for you. The main thing I did was relocate the images in the ebook so they appear at the end of the paragraph where they are first referenced. So the reference to an image within the text, and the image, are far more likely to appear on the same “page” of your screen.

In many ebooks where the publisher does not take as much care as I have, you need to do a lot more jumping back and forth between text and linked images (which are very often on different “pages” of the book than the text you are reading). This happens when the same layout of a print book is used for the layout of an ebook. But print books are meant to be read with two pages facing one another (where an image may be referenced in the text on one page, while appearing on the next facing page), while ebooks (read on mobile phones and tablets) are scrolled as you typically view a single “page” at a time.

So I customized the layout of my ebook for a smoother reading experience on any device — phone, tablet, or computer. I hope you enjoy the result.

 

To purchase and/or read the ebook edition
Please follow the links below for purchase of the ebook. (You can also request that your local library carry both the print and ebook editions).

Note that the ebook looks great on all the ebook platforms, but I personally prefer it on the Apple Books format, thus I’ve listed that link first.

Volume 1, 3rd Edition ebook via Apple Books

 

 

Volume 1, 3rd Edition ebook via Amazon Kindle

 

The ebook is also available from Barnes & Noble on their Nook e-readers, from independent book sellers on Kobo e-readers, Biblioteca, Tolino, and Baker & Taylor.

 

Please consider reviewing the book
For those of you who read and enjoyed the ebook – please consider writing a review where you got it (Apple Books, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, etc.). Reviews help a lot in getting more awareness of, and interest in the books. And as I’m the publisher as well as the author, I really depend on you the readers to help me spread the word on the book and the practices they enable.

Thanks!

Turning Lifeless “Wastes” Into Verdant Water-Harvesting “Urbanite” Terraces in Baja, Mexico and Beyond

By Brad Lancaster © 2019
HarvestingRainwater.com

I love turning “wastes” into resources, thus I love the creative reuse of “urbanite” — the abundant “rock” of broken up chunks of discarded concrete rubble. And I love it even more when the urbanite is used to harvest water and soil in a way that supports the growth of abundant life and greater health.

Such is the case on the ranch of Monica Robinson Bours’ family in Baja, Mexico.

Upon reading the Terraces chapter of my book Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, Monica realized this would be an ideal strategy to stabilize eroding slopes below the ranch house. And being an avid recycler/reuser she knew just where to get the material needed for the terraces’ retaining walls.

Years ago a nearby bridge on the highway had collapsed in a hurricane, and its concrete rubble had just been sitting at the site ever since. Monica knew it could be reused for something, and now she had that thing.

So, Monica and the ranch hands took the rubble back to the ranch, and built a series of beautiful terraces with urbanite retaining walls just below the house. The step-by-step building instructions from the Terraces chapter of my book were their guide. The terraces now stabilize the slope, capture runoff from the house roof and patio, and grow delightful shade for the outdoor gathering area and delicious fruit from the fruit trees (figure 1).

Figure 1. Water- and soil-harvesting terraces with retaining walls of salvaged urbanite from collapsed bridge. Photo by Monica Robinson Bours.

 

But things did not stop there.

 

In the nearest city of La Paz, Monica saw the transportation department demolishing large swaths of sidewalk in a road renovation project. So she turned that “waste” into a resource as well by again taking the rubble back to the ranch to build more terraces (figure 2).

Figure 2. Water- and soil-harvesting terraces with retaining walls of salvaged urbanite from demolished sidewalks. Photo by Monica Robinson Bours.

 

Then, following directions in the In-Channel Strategies chapter of Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, Monica and the ranch hands built 1,600 additional structures within the watershed all slowing, spreading, and sinking the flow of water, where before it had too quickly and erosively been flowing away.

All has worked beautifully, and Monica was beaming with well-deserved pride when I had the honor of touring their wonderful work, after collaborating with her and the city of La Paz to create a street runoff water-harvesting demonstration site via a hands-on workshop (more on that in another blog essay to come).

 

Figure 3. Visiting with Monica and family as we pose with the terrace work. Monica is in white, long-sleeve shirt (second from right).

 

For more examples of how urbanite has been used to harvest water, such as how the La Loma Development Company in Pasadena, California has pulled over 16 million pounds (7 million kg) of concrete rubble from the waste stream to create exquisite high-craft water harvesting installations throughout Los Angeles, and how lifeless concrete-lined drainageways are being jack-hammered and retrofitted into verdant urbanite cobble infiltrationways, along with instructions enabling you to do the same) — see the newly released, dramatically revised, full-color edition of Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, 2nd Edition available at deep discount direct from me the author at https://www.harvestingrainwater.com/shop/

Or ask your local library and/or local bookstores to carry the book.

 

Potential, Challenges, and Resources for Condensate Harvesting

by Brad Lancaster (C) 2019, www.HarvestingRainwater.com

Top of the Austin City Hall air-conditioner-condensate waterfall

Bottom of the Austin City Hall air-conditioner-condensate waterfall

Condensate Harvesting is the harvest of water vapor in the air that freely condenses on cold surfaces at your site.

When water vapor in the air (humidity) comes into contact with a colder surface, the water changes from a gas to a liquid and collects on that colder surface. This water vapor in the air that becomes liquid is referred to as condensate. Common examples are the drops of condensate that form on the outside of a cold glass of iced tea on a humid day, or the condensate that forms on a metal roof in the cool early hours of a humid morning. Much more condensate typically collects on the cold coil of air conditioner and refrigerator units, which is often wastefully discarded via a drain or pipe (see photo below). The hotter and more humid the climate, and/or the more moisture (such as from respiring and perspiring people) in an air-conditioned building; the more condensate air conditioners, refrigerator units, ice machines, and freezers will discharge.

Air-conditioning condensate wastefully drained to sidewalk and street. Hatch, New Mexico

How much condensate does an air conditioner discharge:
In a dry climate or season:
• a home air conditioner can generate 0.25 gallons (1 liter) of condensate/day

• a large commercial air conditioner can generate 500 gallons (1,900 liters)/day

In a humid climate or season:
• a home air conditioner can generate 18 gallons (68 liters) of condensate/day

• a large commercial air conditioner can generate 1,000 gallons (3,750 liters) or more/day

Verdant, living-air conditioner-like tree, irrigated by the air conditioning condensate drained from the air conditioners it shades and cools. Truth or Consequences, New Mexico.

White drainpipe drains condensate to the root zone of native desert willow tree. Truth or Consequences, New Mexico


Quality of condensate
This condensate is basically distilled water, containing low amounts of minerals such as salt, but may contain bacteria. Condensate is great for watering plants, but don’t drink it unless you adequately treat the water. Comparatively, municipal or well water is often relatively high in salt — which can be toxic to plants and soil life — thus condensate can help dilute those salts, making for a healthier growing environment (though salt-free rainwater does an even better job of this).

How to harvest and use condensate
To irrigate with condensate simply direct the condensate (ideally with free gravity—no pumps) to vegetation. It typically should not puddle on the surface, but rather quickly infiltrate into the root zone of the plants to reduce the chance of mosquitoes, bacteria growth in the water, or water loss to evaporation. More organic matter, diverse soil life, and vegetation in the soil increase the rate of infiltration into the soil.

I like to plant a relative oasis of plants (local natives are the easiest to succeed with) at the “spring” where condensate discharge pipes outlet into the landscape. And I like to first route the pipes and outlet where such an oasis can provide the maximum benefits (such as passive cooling, a verdant entryway, etc.)

See the book Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1 3rd Edition to estimate how much condensate your air conditioner may discharge, the water needs (expenses) of potential plants for your condensate “spring” to grow a sustainable oasis in balance with your free on-site waters’ budget (income), and how to situate vegetation for free summer cooling and winter heating of associated buildings and outdoor spaces.

Other free on-site waters can include rainwater, stormwater, snow, fog, greywater, and dark greywater. The new, full-color editions of Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond Volumes 1 and 2 show you how to harvest all of these to great effect, along with case studies of success.

Case study

Pearl Brewery, San Antonio, Texas

Water feature at Pearl Brewery in San Antonio, Texas supplied solely by roof runoff and air conditioning condensate from the brewery’s roof. Overflow water is directed to planted acequias (water channels for irrigation) that cool and beautify the landscape (see next photo). Design and photo by Ten Eyck Landscape Architects.

Planted acequias receiving roof runoff and air conditioning condensate just before they overflow to San Antonio River (seen in upper right quarter of photo). Design and photo by Ten Eyck Landscape Architects. Pearl Brewery, San Antonio, Texas.

The first condensate recovery systems in San Antonio have worked so well that San Antonio became the first city to require that all new commercial buildings design drain lines so that condensate capture is practical.

More info on this site’s condensate and rainwater harvesting at https://1703broadway.com/sustainability-design/water-conservation/
and
https://www.expressnews.com/news/local/politics/article/Pearl-area-complex-brings-cutting-edge-13810993.php

See the latest edition of Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2 for more case studies of condensate harvesting.

Energy costs of condensate and other waters

Check out the energy costs of various sources of water, such as air conditioning (AC) condensate, in the chart below, excerpted from Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1, 3rd Edition.


The zero energy costs for various water sources reflected in the chart above typically result from harvesting those waters with no energy-consuming pumps or water treatment. Energy costs are incurred once pumps or mechanical water treatment is used. Or, in the case of AC condensate, the high energy cost does not reflect the use of pumps, but rather the large amount of energy the air conditioning unit itself consumes when on.Due to the high-energy cost of the manufacture and use of air conditioning units (and their harmful chemical refrigerants – see next section), I don’t consider their condensate to be a truly sustainable on-site water source (even if renewable energy is the power source). But if air conditioners are already on site and used, you ought to at least harvest and use their condensate in beneficial ways, rather than just wastefully drain it away.See appendix 9 of Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1, 3rd Edition for charts and examples that show the water costs of different energy sources and the carbon costs of different energy sources in order to make more beneficial and informed choices in your life.

The refrigerant in air conditioners, refrigeration units, freezers, and ice machines is a major contributor to climate change

According the book Drawdown, the number one cause of climate changing gases in our atmosphere is the chemical refrigerants used in refrigerators and air conditioners.1

As reported in the book, Losing Our Cool: Uncomfortable Truths About Our Air-Conditioned World (and Finding New Ways to Get Through the Summer) by Stan Cox, “The air-conditioning of buildings in America is responsible for a quantity of carbon dioxide equivalent to what would be produced if every household in the country bought an additional vehicle and drove it an average 7,000 miles (11,200 km) per year.”2

This is horrifying due to the massive use and ever-expanding growth of the use of such appliances. But the main problem is not the appliances, but the chemical refrigerants used within them. And as history shows there is a path that could remedy this.

In the past, the chemical refrigerants (specifically chlorofluorocarbons [CFCs] and hydrochlorofluorocarbons [HCFCs] used to absorb and release heat) in refrigerators and air conditioners used to deplete the ozone layer of our atmosphere. That ozone layer is essential for healthy life on our planet as it absorbs, and protects us from, the sun’s ultraviolet radiation.

Thanks to countries around the world agreeing to and signing, the 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer; CFCs, HCFCs, and other ozone-depleting chemicals such as those that used to be used in aerosol cans and dry cleaning; have been phased out of use. As stated in the book Drawdown, “It took two short years from discovery of the gaping hole (in the ozone layer) over the Antarctic for the global community to adopt a legally mandated course of action. Now, three decades later, the ozone layer is beginning to heal.”3

The replacement chemical refrigerant to CFCs and HCFCs, is primarily hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), which does not destroy the ozone layer, but HFCs’ capacity to warm the atmosphere is one thousand to nine thousand times greater than that of carbon dioxide!4

As Drawdown states, “In October 2016, officials from more than 170 countries gathered in Kigali, Rwanda, to negotiate a deal to address the problem of HFCs. Despite challenging global politics, they reached a remarkable agreement. Through an amendment to the Montreal Protocol, the world will begin phasing HFCs out of use, starting with high-income countries in 2019 and then expanding to low-income countries — some in 2024, others in 2028. HFC substitutes are already on the market, including natural refrigerants such as propane and ammonium.”5

The Kigali Amendment took effect January 2019, and over 65 countries have ratified the agreement,6 but as of this writing the U.S. is not one of them.7

 

Take action
Communicate to your politicians and policy makers the importance of ratifying the Kigali Amendment; and make changes in your own lives, by reducing or eliminating your reliance on, and use of, appliances using HFC refrigerant (Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1 gives you many strategies to do this), and dispose of the refrigerant in a way that will keep it out of the atmosphere (Construction and Demolition: How to Properly Dispose of Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Equipment, https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/documents/ConstrAndDemo_EquipDisposal.pdf, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, accessed 11-1-2019).

REFERENCES:

1. Paul Hawken – editor, Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming, Penguin Books, 2017)

2. Stan Cox, Losing Our Cool: Uncomfortable Truths About Our Air-Conditioned World (and Finding New Ways to Get Through the Summer), (The New Press, 2010), page 41.

3. Paul Hawken – editor, Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming, Penguin Books, 2017)

4. Paul Hawken – editor, Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming, Penguin Books, 2017)

5. Paul Hawken – editor, Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming, Penguin Books, 2017)

6. “Kigali Amendment Enters into Force, Bringing Promise of Reduced Global Warming,” by Faye Leone, SDG Knowledge Hub, January 9, 2018, https://sdg.iisd.org/news/kigali-amendment-enters-into-force-bringing-promise-of-reduced-global-warming/, accessed 11-1-2019

7. “What’s Keeping Trump from Ratifying a Climate Treaty Even Republicans Support?,” by Phil McKenna, Inside Climate News, February 12, 2019, https://insideclimatenews.org/news/12022019/kigali-amendment-trump-ratify-hfcs-short-lived-climate-pollutant-republican-business-support-montreal-protocol, accessed 11-1-2019

NOTE: This information will be expanded upon over time and will permanently reside at the link below:

Condensate Harvesting

Check back periodically for updates.

Additional Air-Conditioning Condensate-Harvesting Resources

Giveaway of Brad’s Newly Released Book, “Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, 2nd Edition”

I’m conducting the giveaway of signed copies of the full-color, 2nd edition of Volume 2 September 27 to October 10, 2019.

 

This giveaway is only for people with mailing addresses in the United States, and is done through the website GoodReads.

(Note: To get in the running, you’ll first need to become a member at www.GoodReads.com, but this is super quick and easy.)

Please sign up if you are interested!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 2, 2nd E... by Brad Lancaster
 

Enter Giveaway

 

The book is also available at deep discount direct from the author
Visit my on-line shop here

 

Review request
If you’ve read and enjoyed either of the new, full-color editions of my books just released this summer, please consider writing a review on the GoodReads site, Amazon, and/or any other such site, as this really helps the books get more exposure—which greatly helps to get the information and practice of harvesting and planting the rain, greywater, stormwater, condensate, and other free on-site waters further out into the world so we can regeneratively grow more abundance.

You can also use the following link to my GoodReads author page—or just enter my name in the GoodReads.com search box.

If all goes well, I’ll likely do another GoodReads giveaway in the near future, so check back.

Thanks so much for your interest and support!

-Brad

 

Giveaway of Brad’s Newly Released Book, “Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1, 3rd Edition”

I’m conducting the giveaway of signed copies of the just-released, full-color, 3rd edition of Volume 1 beginning September 25, 2019.

This giveaway is only for people with mailing addresses in the United States, and is done through the website GoodReads.

(Note: To get in the running, you’ll first need to become a member at www.GoodReads.com, but this is super quick and easy.)

Please sign up if you are interested!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1 by Brad Lancaster

Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1

by Brad Lancaster

Giveaway ends October 12, 2019.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

 

Enter Giveaway

The book is also available at deep discount direct from the author
Visit my on-line shop here

 

Review request
If you’ve read and enjoyed either of the new, full-color editions of my books just released this summer, please consider writing a review on the GoodReads site, Amazon, and/or any other such site, as this really helps the books get more exposure—which greatly helps to get the information and practice of harvesting and planting the rain, greywater, stormwater, condensate, and other free on-site waters further out into the world so we can regeneratively grow more abundance.

You can also use the following ling to my GoodReads author page—or just enter my name in the GoodReads.com search box.

If all goes well, I’ll likely do another GoodReads giveaway in the near future, so check back.

Thanks so much for your interest and support!

-Brad

 

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Umbrella Newsletter

The Umbrella: Summer 2020

THE UMBRELLA: A catch-all of resources, events, media, and more from Brad Lancaster In this time of Covid-19 and spending more time at home to be safe, I’ve been grateful for the solace, inspiration, and bountiful sustenance my water-harvesting gardens, landscape, and neighborhood forest has provided me, my family, friends, and neighbors. Record summer heat […]

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