Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond by Brad Lancaster


August 23, 2008

Drops in a Bucket – welcome to my new blog

Hey Harvesters,

Welcome to my new blog, “Drops in a Bucket.”

I call it “Drops in a Bucket” because it represents a celebration of those wonderful little efforts that lead to great things. In the beginning those small efforts often seem like little more than a drop in a bucket. However, this is great if they’re drops in the bucket of abundance. With enough drops we’ll fill the bucket! A drop in a bucket is a problem only if it’s a drop in the wrong bucket – the bucket of scarcity.

This blog will focus generally on the harvests of water, sun, soil, community, and food that help fill that bucket of abundance regeneratively. Good food is key to bringing good people together. To grow that food we need water, sun, soil, and those wonderful people. My intent is to create a party of ideas and examples to inspire and challenge. My hope is that it will help plant many seeds to enhance good efforts already in the works and to influence positive change on the local level, simultaneously affecting the global.

I plan to update this blog at least once a month, but depending on the harvest, it may happen more often. I hope you like it.

– Brad

7 Responses to “Drops in a Bucket – welcome to my new blog”

  1. John deCoville Says:

    While working on my testimonial for rainwater harvesting, I am excited about the changing climate because what I am learning from you is giving me a secure sense of “Sonoran Empowerment”.

    Don’t feel scared, instead read up on what Brad is suggesting!

    Cheers!

    John

  2. Mashallah Ali-Ahyaie Says:

    Hello Brad,

    If not exaggerating, every drop of water is as precious as a pearl grain. But there are a great ignorance worldwide regarding rainwater harvesting. Hopefully all communities, sooner or later, consider the planet earth as a gargantuan bucket, with many many small buckets inside, for harvesting rainfalls in a clean manner, serving humanity.

    I wonder if appropriate buckets are there, on the industrial sites, around the world. Hereunder is a question of mine, raised elsewhere:

    https://ask.extension.org/questions/168491,

    And finally, as I said; rainwater is so precious which made me writing down the following as a sentiment of mine, just for a single issue, regarding rainwater harvesting non-compliance on urbanization, expressed elsewhere:

    “Revenging Rain Drops:”

    “Every drop of rain, wants its final abode, as destined;
    touching the ground, not on the impermeable asphalt or concrete slabs.
    It wants to reach its destination;
    penetrating deep into soil, for further services to mankind,
    But when blocked by asphalt and concrete slabs, it gets angry and mad.
    Suddenly becomes a revenging drop, not a graceful one.
    Revenging drops unite to each other, making tiny streams.
    Tiny streams together, make small streams;
    and small streams unite and make a calm river into a roaring one,
    Roaring rivers merge into a bigger river, passing through a poor city.
    Now, the united revenging rain drops witness the result of their revenge:
    A catastrophic flood, sometimes at the middle of the night;
    hitting the city’s infrastructures, and sleeping children.
    The poor inhabitants are now the victims of their fellow inhabitants;
    of now, and the past, through unwise city developments;
    while preventing every drop of rain,
    to convey its grace from the Almighty God:
    Abiding deep into soil, for further grace to mankind.”

    Rgds

  3. Mashallah Ali-Ahyaie Says:

    Hello Brad,

    On the priority basis, harvested rainwater should be first used where a softer and purer water is most needed. That is where on the industrial sites usages for the harvested rainwater, there are two very good candidates, among other ones; feeding the water demineralization units and cooling towers make-up. Here is what I am trying to convey on the following:

    http://www.linkedin.com/groupAnswers?viewQuestionAndAnswers=&discussionID=5846329396738146308&gid=156368&goback=#commentID_null

    Best regards,

    Mashallah

  4. Mashallah Ali-Ahyaie Says:

    Hello Brad,

    I referred thereto, to the ignorance. Yes, the humanity has been trapped very badly, in negligence regarding the values of rain drops which are valuable as pearl grains. They ignorantly let them becoming dirty runoff streams, becoming more polluted, spreading pollution and eventually running further into floods; devastating our cities.

    On the other hand, industries highly proliferate and deplete the underground waters, and more strangely put a lot of efforts, use a lot of energy and chemicals, with so much investment on the related processes, to make it a softer and purer water, as the rainwater was before, when originally dropped, with very low TDS; for using in their industrial plants sites, for the process purposes.

    Best regards,

    Mashallah

  5. Mashallh Ali-Ahyaie Says:

    Hello Brad,

    Please kindly and frankly tell me the reason for deleting my three blogs.

    Also kinly let me know how one can get access to the digital files of your presentatios, outside your homeland.

    I also hope that some of your books have been sold, in Iran; even I had recommended for translation, into Persian.

    Best regards,

    Nashallah

  6. Megan Says:

    Hi Mashallah, Megan here. I’m sorry for the misunderstanding! We did not delete your posts, we just did not get the usual notification prompting us to approve them. I just happened to come across them now in response to another email notification. At this point, we don’t have Brad’s presentations available in digital format. I have not yet had the time to inquire to Brad’s hosts in Mashhad about his presentation there, but it is still on my list. Thank you for your work and your support of Brad’s!

  7. Mashallah Ali-Ahyaie Says:

    Hello Megan,

    I am still pursuing the scaling up of the Rain Water Harvesting on the industrial sites, as follows:

    http://www.linkedin.com/groups/It-is-worthwhile-all-gigantic-855897.S.5852518137261477889?trk=groups_most_popular-0-b- ttl&goback=%2Egmp_855897

    “It is worthwhile all gigantic water-guzzler industries worldwide, to carry out a feasibility study, for supplementing almost-pure harvested rainwater in their processes.”

    =====
    http://www.linkedin.com/groupAnswers?viewQuestionAndAnswers=&discussionID=5852751266421182465&gid=855897&commentID=5852844124637536256&goback=%2Eamf_855897_6363276&trk=NUS_DISC_Q-subject#commentID_5852844124637536256

    • ““Isn’t the worldwide-neglected field of “RWH,” a diversified engineering fields, and shared with many others; asking for the involvements of all concerned?”

    ==========

    http://www.linkedin.com/groupAnswers?viewQuestionAndAnswers=&discussionID=5851359858166607872&gid=855897&commentID=5851618799349936128&goback=%2Eamf_855897_6363276&trk=NUS_DISC_Q-subject#commentID_5851618799349936128

    “A Worldwide Warm Welcome to Rainwater Harvesting Is a Must on the Industrial Sites”

    Best regards,

    Mashallah

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